Catherine Byron Letters
Correspondence from the John Murray Archive

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1788
Letter 1.   Jack Byron to James Watson, 26 January 1788
Letter 2.   Catherine Byron to James Watson, 22 February 1788
1791
Letter 3.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 15 May 1791
Letter 4.   Catherine Byron to Frances Leigh, 31 May 1791
Letter 5.   Catherine Byron to Frances Leigh, 23 August 1791
1799
Letter 6.   Catherine Byron to the 3rd Duke of Portland, [July 1799]
Letter 7.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 23 July 1799
Letter 8.   Duke of Portland to Catherine Byron, 28 July 1799
Letter 9.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 27 August 1799
Letter 10.   Duke of Portland to Catherine Byron, 28 August 1799
1801
Letter 11.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 4 May 1801
Letter 12.   Catherine Byron to John Laurie, 21 September 1801
Letter 13.   Catherine Byron to John Laurie, 3 October 1801
Letter 14.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 25 October 1801
Letter 15.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 5 November 1801
Letter 16.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 9 November 1801
1802
Letter 17.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 5 September 1802
Letter 18.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 5 September 1802
Letter 19.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 20 September 1802
Letter 20.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 November 1802
1803
Letter 21.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 16 January 1803
Letter 22.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 29 January 1803
Letter 23.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 2 February 1803
Letter 24.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 10 March 1803
Letter 25.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 6 May 1803
Letter 26.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 30 May 1803
Letter 27.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 1 July 1803
Letter 28.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 6 July 1803
Letter 29.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 July 1803
Letter 30.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 7 November 1803
Letter 31.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 November 1803
1804
Letter 32.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 19 January 1804
Letter 33.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 12 March 1804
Letter 34.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 12 May 1804
Letter 35.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 20 July 1804
Letter 36.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 13 August 1804
Letter 37.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 26 August 1804
Letter 38.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 1 October 1804
Letter 39.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 10 October 1804
Letter 40.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 2 December 1804
Letter 41.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 29 December 1804
1805
Letter 42.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 23 January 1805
Letter 43.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 8 February 1805
Letter 44.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 20 February 1805
Letter 45.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 26 June 1805
Letter 46.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 23 September 1805
Letter 47.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, Esq., 23 September 1805
Letter 48.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 5 October 1805
Letter 49.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 7 October 1805
Letter 50.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 13 October 1805
Letter 51.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 6 November 1805
Letter 52.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 25 December 1805
1806
Letter 53.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 11 January 1806
Letter 54.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 29 January 1806
Letter 55.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 1 March 1806
Letter 56.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 4 March 1806
Letter 57.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson
Letter 58.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 18 March 1806
Letter 59.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 26 March 1806
Letter 60.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 31 March 1806
Letter 61.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 21 April 1806
Letter 62.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 24 April 1806
Letter 63.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 5 May 1806
Letter 64.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, 20 September 1806
Letter 65.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, 10 December 1806
Letter 66.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, 22 December 1806
1807
Letter 67.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, 31 January 1807
Letter 68.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 7 March 1807
Letter 69.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 March 1807
Letter 70.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 19 March 1807
Letter 71.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 11 April 1807
Letter 72.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 29 April 1807
Letter 73.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 23 May 1807
Letter 74.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 24 May 1807
Letter 75.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 9 August 1807
Letter 76.   Lord Byron to Elizabeth Massingberd, [Fall 1807?]
Letter 77.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 21 December 1807
1808
Letter 78.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 26 May 1808
Letter 79.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 28 May 1808
Letter 80.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 28 July 1808
1809
Letter 81.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 13 March 1809
Letter 82.   Catherine Byron to John Musters, 22 September 1809
Letter 83.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 26 September 1809
1810
Letter 84.   Margaret Pigot to Catherine Byron, [March? 1810]
Letter 85.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 12 March 1810
Letter 86.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 20 March 1810
Letter 87.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 22 June 1810
Letter 88.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 8 July 1810
Letter 89.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, [Late summer 1810]
Letter 90.   The Duke of Devonshire to Catherine Byron, 18 October 1810
Letter 91.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 31 December 1810
1811
Letter 92.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 8 January 1811
Letter 93.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 15 January 1811
Letter 94.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 January 1811
Letter 95.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 28 May 1811
Letter 96.   Margaret Keith Abercromby to Catherine Byron, 26 July [1811]
Letter 97.   John Hanson[?] to The Morning Herald, August 1811
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Letter 1.   Jack Byron to James Watson, 26 January 1788

Having just learned of the birth of the future Lord Byron, Jack Byron, his spendthrift father, writes to James Watson, Catherine Byron's solicitor, complaining that John Leslie, one of the commissioners of her former Gight estate, has failed to supply the new mother with the funds he requested.

Mr James Watson
George St
Sir

Notwithstanding your writing to Mr Leslie relative to furnishing Mrs Byron with money, he has not done it, & she has not any to go on with. I can find no incidence of cruelty with respect to this—she was brought to bed of a son on Monday last, & is far from well. I beg you will write once more by this days post.

I am Sir
Send the &c &c &c
John Byron Gordon
Edin.
January the 26th
1788


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Letter 2.   Catherine Byron to James Watson, 22 February 1788

A month after the birth of the future Lord Byron, Mrs Byron writes from London to James Watson, her solicitor in Scotland. requesting funds. Her husband Jack Byron is hiding from his creditors and she doesn't trust him with money.

Mr Watson
Writer to the Signet
Georges Street
Edinh
Noble Street February 22, 1788
Sir

I shall make Mr Becket give you an account of all Mr Byrons Debts that we know of as soon as possible but I hope the money wont be given to him, but to have some body to pay them for he will only pay what he is obliged to pay and there will be still more debts coming in & more demands for money. I am very sorry he is getting a new carriage. the money Mr Leslie gave me is not sufficient to clear all my expences but I will let you know exactly what I shall want in a few days and what I shall want to keep me in London for two months longer as I have taken a House for that time at two Guineas and a half a week which is just twenty guineas for the two months. I would not have taken one till I had known Mr Byrons plans but the time I must leave this is on Sunday and I could not get any for a shorter time and none so cheap. I will not go to Bath nor will I leave this till Mr Byron gets a house & is fixed for I am tired of so many journeys and I am sure I can live as cheap here as in Bath as I don't keep a carriage and have got a House so cheap. I hope by the time my little Boy is able to travel Mr Byron will have got a house in some cheap country whether Wales or the North of England. I want Money to be sent me to keep me while in Town and I must have it as if Mr Byron gets it it will be thrown away in some foolish way or other and I shall be obliged to apply for more. I don’t wish more than is necessary but I will let you know exactly in a few days. I will live as cheap as I can but it was impossible till now as there was a great many expences that could not be avoided[.] direct for me No 2 Baker Street Portmans Square[.] my little Boy is to be named George[.] don’t show Mr Byron this[.] I am

with Regard
C B G


1791
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Letter 3.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 15 May 1791

Mrs Byron, apparently in London, writes a note on financial matters to her newly-acquired London solicitor John Hanson. Hanson (1755-1841) would become the estate manager at Newstead Abbey and one of Byron's executors.

John Hanson Esqr
6 Chancery Lane
Saturday 15th May
Sir

On looking over an account I find all these receipts wanting, which I wish you could find & send me. I hope it will not be the case but if your Papers were to fall into the other hands it might create me uneasiness & confusion hereafter. I hope Mrs Hanson continues to do well[.] I am

Sir your obed serv't
C G Byron


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Letter 4.   Catherine Byron to Frances Leigh, 31 May 1791

Mrs. Byron writes to her sister-in-law Frances Leigh in London asking her to have a special shoe made for her son's deformed foot. Her early attempts to ingratiate herself with the Byron family were not successful.

Mrs Leigh
No 33 Brompton Row
near Knights Bridge
London
Aberdeen May the 31st
My Dear Madam

I am much obliged to you for your kind attention about Georges shoe[.] his foot turns inward and it is the right foot[.] he walks quite on the side of his foot[.] I have sent an old shoe that was made here & it is the size that fits him at present. Mr Marten will see by the shoe how well it answered with him[.] his foot turns in very much & would need something very stiff to keep it out.

I have never seen any of the Bonnets you mention here yet they are out of fashion in London long before they come and you are very good in offering to send me one[.] I would be much obliged to you if you would take the trouble of sending me 10 yards of wide printed cotton pretty fine[.] you can send it when you send Georges shoe and if you send it to Hendrie the Perfumer he will send them down to Anderson Lane[.] I have given the old shoe of Georges to Anderson & he is to send it to Hendrie & Mr Byron ?seals?[.] I beg you will let me know what these things comes to & I will pay the money to Anderson[.] I told Anderson what you desired[.] he tells me he is to get the Dog you want in three weeks & send it to you[.]

I hope you will soon get your business settled. Pray where is your Nephew William what makes you think that he will not live long[?] do you know that when Mr Byron came to Scotland about two year ago he told me he was dead & ?till? the time he went away persisted in it[?] not that I ever believed him[.] is he in bad health that you don't think he will live long[?] I am sorry to make you pay for so many postages of letters & particularly so as I have nothing to say that can amuse you[.] I would not do it but there is not a great person as a member of Parliament in this place[?] is Mr Byron still at your house in France. Pray excuse all the trouble I am giving you & believe me to be with you in time.

Your most affectionate sister
C Byron


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Letter 5.   Catherine Byron to Frances Leigh, 23 August 1791

Writing after the death of her husband in France, Catherine Byron writes to his sister Frances Leigh, with whom he had been living. On June 21, 1791, John Byron had altered his will to make his sister his executrix and sole beneficiary of the £400 he thought would be redeemable from his parents' estate. Mrs Leigh dropped Mrs Byron's acquaintance and stopped answering her letters.

Mrs Leigh
No 33 Brompton Row
near Knights Bridge
London
Aberdeen August 23d 1791
My Dear Madam

You wrong me very much when you suppose I would not lament Mr Byrons death[.] it has made me very miserable and the more so that I had not the melancholy satisfaction of seeing him before his death[.] if I had known of his illness I would have come to him[.] I do not think I shall every get the better of it[.] necessity not inclination parted us at least on my part and I flatter myself it was the same with him and notwithstanding all his foibles for they deserve no worse name. I ever sincerely loved him and believe me my Dear Madam, I have the greatest regard and affection for you for the very kind part you have acted to poor Mr Byron and it is a great comfort to me that he was with so kind a friend at the time of his death[.] you say he was sensible to the last[.] did he ever mention me was he long ill and where was he buryd[.] be so good as write all these particulars and also send me some of his hair.

as to money matters they are perfectly indifferent to me[.] I only wish there may be enough to pay his debts and to pay you the money you have laid out on his account[.] I wish it was in my power to do all this but a hundred & fifty pounds a year will do little which is all I have and am ?due? a good deal of money in this country.

George is well[.] I shall be happy to let him be with you some time[,] but at present he is my only comfort and the only thing that makes me wish to live[.] I hope if anything should happen to me you will take care of him[.] I was not well before and I do not think I shall ever recover[.] the sincere shock I have received[.] it was so unexpected if I had only seen him before he died[.] did he ever mention me[.] I am miserable & very poor[.] believe me

Yours with sincere Affection
C Byron

Pray write soon[.]



1799
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Letter 6.   Catherine Byron to the 3rd Duke of Portland, [July 1799]

This is the draft of a letter composed by John Hanson for Mrs Byron to send to the Duke of Portland, then the Tory leader of the House of Lords, requesting a Civil List pension for herself. Her son had become heir to the Byron estate in May, 1798, and most of her own fortune having gone to pay her husbands debts, and with the Newstead estate in serious need of repair, she was pressed for money. The Duke of Portland obtained the pension of £300 a year for Mrs. Byron; it was to be administered by Hanson. At the time a complicated mortgage transaction left the Duke of Portland owing Lord Byron £1,000.

My Lord

Being a stranger to your Grace I feel much Embarrassment in presuming to address you upon a Subject of so much Delicacy but the knowledge I have of your Graces Candour & Goodness and the Peculiarity of my own Situation prompt me to solicit your Graces attention to what I am about to state.

By the Death of the late Lord Byron that Title devolved upon my Son now 12 years of Age and with it an Estate not exceeding £[...] a year and that even in a the most dilapidated Condition. My own Sitn is simply this. Upon my Marriage with the late Mr Byron he possessed my Fortune which was considerably more than £20,000[.] but unfortunately for myself & Son all that is left of it is £4,200 and to ye Int[.] whereof I am intitled to during my Life Subject to a Payment thereout of £60 a year to my aged Grand Mother which reduces my Income to £150 a year which is all that I have to live upon and since the Death of Mr Byron in 17[...] to the Death of the late Lord Byron in May 1798 I have had to maintain my Son out of it[.] I am myself descended from an ancient and noble family namely Sir Wm Gordon who [....]

It has been mentioned to me that Person's in my Situation have been thought ye object of his Majestys Bounty. May I then indulge a Hope that my Situation when represented to the Throne[....]



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Letter 7.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 23 July 1799

Mrs. Byron confirms that she has followed John Hanson’s directions to write to the Duke of Portland requesting a pension. She informs her solicitor that her taxes have not been paid, which in 1799 amounted to £47.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Dear Sir

I only received your letter yesterday. I have sent the letter to the Duke as you desire. I wrote to Byron a few days ago[.] I have no doubt his being happy with his young friend, but I am sure both you and Mrs Hanson have a great deal of trouble with him.

?G. Meath? has been here again about that everlasting taxes he says Mr Smith sent for him and they are not yet paid. I beg my kind Complts to Mrs Hanson and any love to Byron. I am

sincerely your
C G Byron

Newsted July 23d



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Letter 8.   Duke of Portland to Catherine Byron, 28 July 1799

The Duke of Portland replies to Mrs. Byron, reporting that he has forwarded her request for a pension to the prime minister, William Pitt.

Bulstrode Sunday 28 July 1799
Madam

I have received the honour of your Letter of the 23d & will take the earliest opportunity of communicating the substance of it to Mr Pitt in order that it may be laid before His Majesty who, I am persuaded, will be disposed to take the Case into his most favourable consideration & shew it all the attention which circumstances will permit.

I must beg you to accept my thanks for the confidence you are pleased to repose in me, which I hope you will not have any reason to think you have misplaced, or that I am wanting in the Respect which I have always professed for both the Illustrious Families to which you have the honor to belong.

I have the honor to be
Madam
Your most Obdedient & most
Honorable Servant
Portland
Mrs Byron

July 5th 99
Pension granted to commence from this date.



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Letter 9.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 27 August 1799

Mrs. Byron writes a letter thanking John Hanson for helping her to obtain the civil list pension and requests his assistance in writing letters of acknowledgement. She invites Mrs Hanson to accompany her husband and Lord Byron to Newstead—Byron had been living on and off with the Hanson family, John Hanson become something of a surrogate father to the unruly ten-year-old boy.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Newstead August 27th 1799
Dear Sir

As you have been so very friendly to me in the business, which I shall ever remember with gratitude, I lose no time in sending you a copy of the Dukes letter, as I am sure from the friendship you have shown to me you will rejoice at it. I certainly ought to write to his grace to thank him, and also to Lord Carlisle for the share he has had in this affair. If you would have the goodness, when you have time to send me a copy of what you think I should say to each of them, as I do hate to write formal letters to these great People.

I hope My Dear Boy is well, and that your family are so, & that Mrs H. will accompany you to Newstead I am

Dr Sir
yours sincerely
C G Byron

P.S. I received the letter this day[.] I sent Ld B some things which I hope you have received[.]



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Letter 10.   Duke of Portland to Catherine Byron, 28 August 1799

The Duke of Portland writes to Mrs. Byron that she has been granted a £300 pension, which is to begin immediately.

Bulstrode Saturday 28th August 1799
Madam

I have at length the honor of acquainting you that The King has been graciously pleased to take into consideration the circumstances of your situation, which it was your desire should be laid before His Majesty, & to give order to Mr Pitt in consequence of it that a Pension of £300 per annum should be made to you out of the Civil List & that it should commence forthwith.

I fear you may have thought me dilatory in the execution of your commands but had not till yesterday an opportunity of communicating with Mr Pitt since His Majestys pleasure was signified to Him on this subject.

I shall esteem myself very happy if the part I have been entrusted with in this business has been fulfilled in such a manner as to contribute to your satisfaction, & if you have the goodness to consider it as a testimony of the Respect I have professed for the great Families to which you belong & of that with which I have the honor to be[.]

Madam
your most obedient
& most faithful Humble Servant
Portland


1801
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Letter 11.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 4 May 1801

The Chancery Court has been dilatory in disbursing Lord Byron's funds and Mrs Byron requests a meeting with John Hanson to pursue the matter. The court had established a fund created from rents collected from the Newstead estate which was to pay out £500 annually to cover Lord Byron's educational expenses; he was to receive the remaining balance when he came of age in 1809.

John Hanson Esqr
6 Chancery Lane
Sunday 4th May
Sir

It is five months since I came to Town for no other purpose then to get my business settled. as the Master has granted every sum I desired I am now at a loss to account for the delay. I desire that you will fix a day when you will come to my House, or I come to yours, to settle the accounts and to adjust and receive the ballance and also my receipts.

As I was in hopes I would have been enabled to leave Town before this time, I gave up my Lodgings, in consequence they are now taken and I am obliged to leave them the 6th of May. I have taken another for one week at No 23 George Street Portmans Square, corner of Baker Street where I shall go on Thursday next[.] I am

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron

The servant waits an answer. I also want thirty pounds immediately.



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Letter 12.   Catherine Byron to John Laurie, 21 September 1801

Writing to John Laurie, the truss-maker who made the instruments used to correct Lord Byron's lameness, Mrs Byron expresses her displeasure at his “extremely high” charge of £150 a year for his visits. Such a sum would consume a considerable fraction of her annual income.

Mr Laurie
No 2 Bartholomew Close
near West Smithfield
London
Brighton Sept 21st 1801
Sir,

After looking over your bill I think it comes extremely high at the rate of a hundred and fifty pounds a year, and three guineas a visit to Harrow I think a great deal of Money.

I am however sensible that Lord Byron certainly walks better than he did[;] therefore you may continue your visits to him at Harrow, but do not go there before Monday the 28th in case any thing should prevent my Son from being at Harrow before that time[.]

C G Byron


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Letter 13.   Catherine Byron to John Laurie, 3 October 1801

In response to John Laurie's reply, Mrs. Byron concedes that Byron has received some benefits from the braces but remains annoyed at the charges.

Mr Laurie
No 2 Bartholomew Close
near West Smithfield
London
Brighton Oct 3d 1801
Sir

I received your letter this day. I have not yet made up my mind about your attending Lord Byron, the expense is so great that it requires consideration although I allow that he has received benefit[.]

C G Byron


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Letter 14.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 25 October 1801

Mrs. Byron complains that John Hanson has not been attending to her business with the Chancery Court fund and has not been answering her letters—a frequent subject in the letters. She asks Hanson what the deceased countess of Holderness has left to Augusta Byron, her granddaughter and Lord Byron's half-sister. Augusta Byron had seen nothing of her brother since as a child she had gone to live with Lady Holderness, who had wanted nothing to do with Catherine Byron—whose former husband had broken up her daughter's first marriage to the Duke of Leeds.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Brighton Octr 25th 1801
Dear Sir

I have wrote several letters to you. I dont know if you have received them. Mich. term soon begins and you surely will get my business settled before it ends. I wish it very much that I may fix upon some plan for the winter.

Do you know what Lady Holdernesse has left Augusta.

I wish you could find out & let me know I shall be quite anxious till I hear. I had a letter from her lately but it is impossible for me to ask herself[.]

I ever am
with sincere Regard
C G Byron


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Letter 15.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 5 November 1801

Mrs. Byron has come up to town to get her Chancery Court business settled. As Chancery solicitor, John Hanson's duty was to report Byron's educational expenses so that she could be reimbursed out of the trust drawn from the Newstead rents.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
Sir

I am come to town on purpose to get the accounts payed before the Master, and as my stay here will be very short I must desire you will immediately send me the Copies of the accounts as they are to go to the Master that I may see that the sums are rightly charged to the separate accounts. this I repeat again[.] I must have done before tomorrow night and I leave town on Monday which you can easily do as you told me in August they were ready[.]

C G Byron
Friday, 5th Nov
No 51 Parliament Street


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Letter 16.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 9 November 1801

In an impatient note Mrs Byron instructs John Hanson to leave such accounts as he has completed at her London address.

John Hanson Esqr
6 Chancery Lane
Sir

As you cannot get the accounts ready so soon as I before desired, I must request you will within a week at least leave the accounts sealed up for me at 51 Parliament Street. The next half years accounts can be added afterwards[.]

 
C G Byron
Novr 9th 1801


1802
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Letter 17.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 5 September 1802

Writing from Cheltenham Spa where she is staying with her son, Mrs. Byron asks John Hanson to provide Byron with a bed on his return to Harrow, where he had enrolled in April 1801 at the age of twelve.

Cheltenham 5th Septr 1802
Sir

I would be obliged to you if you could accommodate my son with a bed for one night at your House on his way to Harrow[;] he will be in Town on Tuesday the 21st[.] You will be so good as but let me know if you will be in London then. I remain

Sir
your most obed servt
C G Byron

Turn over



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Letter 18.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 5 September 1802

John Hanson replies on the back of Mrs Hanson's note. The Great House, originally the residence of a Lady Stapleton, housed boarders down to 1838.

Honble Mrs Byron
Great House
Cheltenham

A Bed in Chancery Lane requested by his Mother on one or 2 occasions. he spent the whole of his Harrow vacations in Chancery Lane

5th Septr 1802


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Letter 19.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 20 September 1802

Mrs. Byron asks John Hanson to confirm that Lord Byron has presented himself on his belated return Harrow. Her half-years’ allowance appears to be late, and she will ask the headmaster at Harrow to draw on Hanson directly to pay Byron's tuition. As Mr. Clay’s lease is ending, it is time for Hanson to find a new tenant for Newstead Abbey. The house was rented to the two Miss Launders.

Mr Hanson
Cheltenham 20th Septr 1802
Sir

I hope Byron will arrive safe. You will be so good as write me a line immediately to let me know of his arrival in Town. I have given him money for every expense his Coach to Harrow & & &[.] I wish him to go to school soon.

You know the half years Allowance falls due at Michaelmas and I did intend to draw for the balance at that time, but a week or ten days will make no difference to me, so you can let me know when it is convenient for you to pay the money. In future when I have occasion for money I shall draw for a quarter[.] I don't know how I shall pay Dr Drury but by giving him a draft on you.

I hear Mr Clay is to leave Newstead this Month. best compliments to Mrs H[.]

I am yours sincerely
C G Byron

Pray send the included letter to the Penny Post

Drawn for £40. 0. 0
Given Mr Rudd 15.15. 0
Intend giving Dr Drury a draft for 56.17. 6
Balance which I meant to draw for 137. 7. 6
250. 0. 0


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Letter 20.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 November 1802

Mrs. Byron, still short of funds, asks John Hanson to give her a bill so that she can draw against the amount due to her in January. Her pension is not being paid. The "Scottish income" to which she refers is the interest on the £1,200 her grandmother, Lady Gight, left her upon her death, and the small remains of her personal fortune from the Gight estate. This money was managed by her Edinburgh solicitor.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Bath 17th Novr 1802
Sir

As I have occasion for money I shall draw on you in a few days for a hundred and twenty five pounds payable the 5th Jany next, which is one quarter. I believe I shall find it necessary to be paid quarterly, as my income in Scotland is only paid once a year, and my Pension so irregularly. The paper says two quarters are to be paid immediately but I have as yet heard nothing of it. I hope Mrs Hanson and your family are well. I ever am

Sir
with sincere Regard
C G Byron
No 16 Henrietta Street


1803
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Letter 21.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 16 January 1803

Mrs. Byron wants to send her son to stay with the Hansons for a few days upon his return to Harrow. She has heard a rumor that Mrs Chaworth's right to Annesley Park, adjacent to Newstead Abbey, is being challenged and informs her solicitor that Lord Byron's claims to the place are stronger than those of the challenger, Lord Meath. Hanson apparently did not pursue the matter.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Bath 16th Jany 1803
No 16 Henrietta Street
Sir

I propose if agreeable to send my Son to your House in Town for a night or two in his way to Harrow. I intend that he shall leave this place on Monday the 24th and he will arrive in Town the 25th.

A report prevails in Nottinghamshire that Lord Meath is to dispute Mrs Chaworths title to her Estates[.] I don't know what truth is in it, but whatever rights Lord Meath may have Lord Byrons are equal as Lady Meath & Lady Byron were Sisters and both Daughters to Lord Chaworth. Mrs Chaworth is the descendant of a natural son of this Lord Chaworth. Byron joins me in wishing you and Mrs Hanson many happy return of this season[.] I am

Sir
your most obed[.] servt
C G Byron


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Letter 22.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 29 January 1803

John Hanson writes that Lord Byron, who had been quarreling with Dr. Drury, the headmaster at Harrow, is now bent on returning to school. Cambridge at age fifteen. In the event, Byron returned to Harrow.

Dear Madam

I did not fail to communicate your Message in the former Letter to Ld Byron[.] he seems now to think that his not returning to Harrow would after what has been sayd, amount in the opinion of his Friends to an ?Affectation? and as that Idea hurts him very much and he has a great Wish to speak my opinion[.] he seems bent upon his returning and I have no Hesitation in saying I think he is right, but this I am persuaded[—]if he does not return to Harrow he will be for going to College and I think on many accounts that shod be deferred[.] If a proper Tutor was already provided I should think it would be best to place him in such a Situation for a Year or so, but I am sure it will be a Matter of Difficulty and consequently attended with Delay to meet with a Person at all equal to ye Sitn[—]and unless ye Person is fully equal to instructing Ld Byron it will not only be lost Time but do him considerable Injury[.] I presume he has written you his Ideas on the Subject[.] I assure you whilst he has been with me he has conducted himself with great Propriety & good Sense and much as I covet his Society I could have wished he had devoted some Part of his Vacation to his Mother but his Time has been taken up in very rational Pursuits and ye more I see of him the more I am convinced he is pursuing a Course that will lead him on to Consequence and Fame[—]and at the same time you know well enough that he requires a Stimulation to keep him up to Perfection and unless he shod be fortunate enough to fall into ye Hands of a Tutor of active Mind professed Information and superior Talents, I think there is a Danger of his sinking into Indolence and Inaction[.] This is best avoided in Scenes whose ?flame? is Competition & Emulation[.] If he were now to go to College it is ye Opinion of many ?Gentn? he is fitt for. you must be aware that it will take nearly the whole of his Allowance to support him there

J Hanson
29th January 1803


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Letter 23.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 2 February 1803

Not having received John Hanson's letter, Mrs. Byron writes to say that she would like Byron, then staying with the Hansons, to return to Harrow as opposed to joining her at Bath. She would like the business about Annesley Park attended to.

John Hanson Esqr
6 Chancery Lane
London
Bath 2d Feb 1803
No 16 Henrietta Street
Sir,

I am rather surprised I have not heard from you. You may believe I am very anxious to have the business settled I wrote to you about, as I do not wish my Son to remain here idle.

I am told it is certainly true that Lord Meath is to dispute Mrs Chaworths title to her Estates, and that Lawyers are employed on both sides. if that is the case it is time Lord Byrons interest should be attended to[.] I am

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 24.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 10 March 1803

Lord Byron has returned to Harrow and John Hanson has found a more permanent tenant for Newstead Abbey—Lord Grey de Ruthyn—who would take a five-year lease at £50 per year. As Mrs Byron fears, this would lead to conflict as the temporary tenants, the Miss Launders, who were under the impression that they would have the place for the duration of Lord Byron's minority.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Bath 10th March 1803
16 Henrietta Street
Sir,

I am happy to inform you that my son has had the Measles. I hope your Boy will do well, but for God sake if there is any fever at Harrow take Byron to town. I am told the Paris Fever that has been so fatal there, now prevails in England.

I am glad Newstead is well lett but what are the Miss Launders to do[?] I cannot find Lord Grey de Ruthyns title in the Peerage of England Ireland or Scotland. I suppose he is a new Peer.

If you come to Bath when you intend I will be here and shall expect to see you. I hope Mrs Hanson and your other Children are well[.] I remain

Sir
your most obed servt
C G Byron 

I am much obliged to you and Mrs H. for your attention to Byron



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Letter 25.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 6 May 1803

Lord Byron is now feuding with Joseph Drury, an assistant master at Harrow and the son of the headmaster. If Byron were to quit Harrow, she has no room to receive him as she is now living in lodgings in Nottingham.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Nottingham 6th May 1803
Park Row
Sir

I send you a letter from Byron[.] I would not be surprised if he was to come here. for God sake see to settle this business and if he will leave Harrow he must go to some other School. I will not have his education interrupted and I have at present no home or House to receive him. it is extremely vexatious and very odd that the Doctor cannot make his son behave with propriety to the Boys[.]

your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 26.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 30 May 1803

Mrs. Byron draws on the next quarter’s allowance. Owen Mealey found her a place to rent near Nottingham: Burgage Manor, in Southwell, where she would remain for the five years Lord Grey de Ruthyn leased Newstead Abbey.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Nottingham 30th May 1803
Sir,

I intend drawing on you for the balance of the quarters allowance due me the 5th July next.

I have taken a House at Southwell called Burgage Manor, with a Garden & ground just as I could wish, but I shall not go to it till July[.] I am

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron
Mather & Mandall 50. 0. 0
Drury 47. 4. 0
Balance 27.16. 0
125. 0. 0


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Letter 27.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 1 July 1803

Mrs Byron asks for assistance in dealing with the London instrument-maker who manufactured the braces for Byron's club foot. The impending arrival of Lord Grey de Ruthyn at Newstead is causing difficulties with the tenant farmers at Newstead and she asks John Hanson to intervene.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Nottingham 1st July 1803
Park Row
Sir

I enclose you two letters[,] one from ?Sus?, the other from Byron. I beg you will take the trouble to call or send to Sheldrake about his shoes, and instrument. I have wrote repeatedly but to no purpose[.] I came from Newstead yesterday and am sorry to inform you that the new Tenant Mr Rushton will not let Wm. Hibbert into the Rock House. Lord Grey is extremely angry that his Keeper cannot get to the Lodge and will probably discharge Hibbert, and the poor man and his family will be deprived of bread which would make me very unhappy. I wish you could settle this business. I hope your family are well[.] I am

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 28.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 6 July 1803

Mrs. Byron, in the process of furnishing Burgage Manor, has drawn on her solicitor for £125 against the Chancery Court funds due to her the next quarter.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Nottingham 6th July 1803
Sir

I have this day drawn on you for a hundred and twenty five pounds, being the same due me from Lord Byrons estates at Michaelmas next[.] I am

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 29.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 July 1803

Mrs. Byron suggests that John Hanson postpone his journey to Newstead to settle matters with the tenants since she is not yet settled in Burgage Manor and the temporary Newstead tenants, Frances and Ursula Launder, were not yet out—in fact, they were refusing to leave.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Nottingham July 17th 1803
Sir,

I have no objection to Byron coming down with you in the stage. I intend going to Southwell on Thursday[.] therefore the best way will be for you to come to Newstead in the Mail & take a House there, which is only eight miles from Southwell and leave Byron with me, and proceed yourself to Newstead which is only twelve miles from Southwell.

It would be more convenient for me if you could put of[f] your journey for a few days as I shall hardly be settled, and also better for yourself as I am sure the Miss Launders will not leave newstead next week, nor for some time I fancy if they can help it[.] I am

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron

26th July 1803[.] Lord Byron sett off by ye Mail Coach to Newark & ?has around? him six Pounds to pay his Expenses[.]

H & B


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Letter 30.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 7 November 1803

Mrs. Byron proposes that Lord Byron remain in Nottinghamshire, given the proximity of the term’s end. He had been smitten with Mary Chaworth and refusing to return to Harrow. She withdraws more money, which is itemized at the end of the letter.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 7th of Novr 1803
Sir

Byron is really so unhappy that I have agreed much against my inclination to let him remain in this country till after the next holidays, and it is now so late it is hardly worthwhile for him to return before that time. I have drawn on you for money[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron
Money Mr Hanson gave Lord Byron 6. 0. 0
Draft to Dr Drury 57. 0. 0
Draft to Mr Gray 36. 0. 0
99. 0. 0

Balance £26.0.0 which I shall draw for which makes a quarters allowance up to the 25 Decr



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Letter 31.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 November 1803

Mrs. Byron would like to repair Newstead but her meager income is insufficient. With Lord Byron’s Rochdale property tied up in legal disputes, she hopes that John Hanson will be successful in securing the rights to the Brownwardle coal mines‚—he would not anytime soon. The Duke of Portland still owes Byron £1,000 plus interest on a mortgage—which he would seek to recover for over a decade. Lord Grey de Ruthyn will be a good tenant, but it “ought to be put out of his power to be a bad one.”

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell Novr 17th 1803
Sir

Not having seen you for some time, and not being likely to see you soon, I wish to know something of my Sons affairs. Pray has he recovered his property in Lancashire sold by the late Lord! has the Duke of Portland paid the thousand pounds and the interest due to my Son. I think you informed me that Sir C. Morgan had given up the Estate and paid the arrears.

The House at Newstead it is my opinion will soon be in ruins, and the Park is in a deplorable state. by the bye when Augusta Byron and myself agreed that whatever money was judged necessary should be laid out upon it I am rather surprised it is not in a better state, (as we only could be injured by it) but as I have only five hundred a year and so little has been done, the savings of course must be greater and I would be obliged to you to inform me in what manner the money is laid out whether in the funds or not.

I think every Tenant ought to be restricted properly and then it is not in their power to do mischief. had Mr Clay been so he could not have sent Lord Byrons Carr[iage] into Yorkshire. I hope Lord Grey will be a good Tenant but still it ought to be put out of his power to be a bad one.

I hope your family are well. Byron joins me in best wishes to you and I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


1804
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Letter 32.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 19 January 1804

Mrs. Byron asks John Hanson to accommodate Lord Byron on his return to Harrow, reports on his expenditures for the last quarter, and draws on Hanson for the next.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 19th Jany 1804
Sir,

I am extremely obliged to you for the fine Doe you sent me which was extremely good.

Byron will be in town next week I think about Thursday in his way to Harrow, and I hope it will be convenient for you to let him have a bed for one night.

I have drawn on you for the money due me the 25th of Decr last, and also for what will be due at Lady day Lady day. I hope all your family are well. Byron joins me in best compliments to you and Mrs Hanson[.] I remain

Sir
your very obed servt
C G Byron

State of our account

Dr Drury 57. 0. 0
Mr Wm Grey 36. 0. 0
Brown of Derby 7. 1. 6
Given Ld Byron July last 8. 0. 0
106. 1. 6
Balance due me Decr last 18.18. 6
125. 0. 0
Quarter due the 25th March next 125. 0. 0
250. 0. 0


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Letter 33.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 12 March 1804

Apparently John Hanson has begun assembling the documentation required for Lord Byron to take his seat in the House of Lords when he comes of age. Mrs. Byron, strikingly, can’t remember the day of her wedding date (it was May 13). Byron will stay with Hansons on his return to Nottinghamshire for the Spring vacation.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southewell March 12th 1804
Dr Sir

Mr Farquhar of Doctors Commons has a copy of a certificate of my Marriage which he got from Bath at the time the late Lord died. he also sent a copy of it to Aberdeen which copy I gave to you when I first saw you at Newstead. I was married however on the 12th or 13th of May (I don't know which) 1785 at Saint Michaels Church Bath, (and Saint Michaels Parish I suppose but I dont know for certain) and this is all I can inform you about it. I dont know where the late Mr Byron was Baptized, nor do I know where the late Lords Son was buried. Mr Sykes the Navy Agent who lives in some street in the Strand is a likely Person to know, or old Joe Murray at the Duchess of Leeds I dare say can inform you where the late Lords Son was burried.

Byron will leave Harrow again before the end of this Month, therefore I shall desire him to come to your House, and if he chooses to remain a few days or a week in town I hope it will not be inconvenient for you to receive him. You will also give him money to come here as I wish to see him[.] with best compts. to you and Mrs Hanson[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 34.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 12 May 1804

Mrs. Byron encloses a letter from her unruly son who blames John Hanson and Lord Grey de Ruthyn for his being considered “poor” at Harrow. She will draw upon Hanson for the next quarter and includes a brief itemized list of expenses.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 12th May 1804
Sir

I hope you arrived safe in Town and found your family well and Mrs Hanson perfectly recovered. I enclose you a letter from Byron[.] what is to be done with him when he leaves Harrow God only knows. he is a turbulent unruly Boy that wants to be emancipated from all restraint. his sentiments are however noble. you see he blames you and Lord Grey for his being supposed to be poor at Harrow. I shall draw on you soon for the quarter due me at midsummer[.] I am

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron
Money given Lord Byron for Journey 5.12. 6
Money given him 0. 7. 0
5.19. 6
balance due me 119. 0. 6


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Letter 35.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 20 July 1804

Mrs. Byron instructs Hanson not to “take a place in the mail” for her son, as she is now at No. 10 Piccadilly, London, and will take him with her on her return to Southwell.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Friday July 20th 1804
Sir,

I am informed by Byron that he has wrote to you to desire that you will “take a place in the mail” for him on Wednesday next the 25th, which I beg you will not do as I am now at No 16 Piccadilly and I shall take him to Southwell with me. he will however be obliged to you for a bed on Wednesday next if convenient[.] Compts to Mrs Hanson[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 36.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 13 August 1804

Mrs. Byron will draw on Hanson for Byron's fall-term expenses. She notes that her son, then at Burgage Manor for the summer vacation, is “more improved in every respect” after his difficult year at Harrow.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 13th August 1804
Sir

I have drawn on you this day for the balance of the quarter due for my son last Michaelmas. I cannot help mentioning that never was a Boy more improved in every respect. he is now truly amiable and I shall not know how to part with him.

I hope your family are well[.] Byron joins me in compts to you and Mrs Hanson[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron
Draft Cheatham 50. 0. 0
Draft Foster 16. 0. 0
you pd for Coach 2. 0. 0
draft Cheatham 57. 0. 0
125. 0. 0


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Letter 37.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 26 August 1804

A Newstead tenant, John Palethorpe, is in debtor’s prison. Mrs. Byron is not pleased with what John Hanson has told her about the Rochdale lawsuit.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 26th August
Sir,

I send you poor Pailethorpes letter[.] I wish you could get his affairs settled in some way that the man might get out of Prison. what you told me in Town gives me much uneasiness[.] I hope the Estate will be recovered. Byron intends to write to you soon, and joins me in Compts to you and Mrs Hanson[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 38.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 1 October 1804

Mrs. Byron has drawn on her account with Hanson for £110 for furniture and other expenses.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell Octr 1st 1804
Sir,

I shall draw on you for one hundred and ten pounds, and I have a few hundred pounds to pay away at this time for furniture. as I suppose you gave Byron the fifteen pounds, the one hundred and ten will make the balance due me for the quarter allowance ending the 25th of Decr[.] I remain

Sir
your very obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 39.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 10 October 1804

Mrs. Byron writes to John Hanson about a rumor that Lord Byron had "gained his cause"—referring to winning the Rochdale case. Mrs Byron has been collecting family information from her friend and Nottingham neighbour, the elderly widow of the fourth baron. Hanson was assembling the documents required to get Lord Byron seated in the House of Lords when he came of age.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell Oct 10th 1804
Sir

I am just returned from Nottingham, and one day at dinner Mrs Byron received a letter from her Son, wherein he mentions that he had seen a Lancaster paper where it was said that Lord Byron had gained his cause there. however I cannot believe it as I have not heard from you.

I am informed that Lady Byron that was Mrs Berkeley was either married at Abbey Bruton Somersetshire the Seat of her Father, or in Berkeley Square London.

Byrons father was certainly born at Plymouth, the late Lord Byron his Brother and Sister were some born at Newstead, others in London, and at Bullwell Park and of course baptised there. best compts to you and Mrs Hanson[.] I ever am

with sincere Regard
C G Byron

I have drawn on you for a hundred and ten pounds[.]



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Letter 40.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 2 December 1804

A Mr. Carrwell has paid off a £3,000 loan to Mrs. Byron’s trustees in Scotland and she would like Hanson to send her the funds to repay his bond. Her Scottish inheritance has since been lent to Sir James Grant, a Scottish MP and landowner.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 2d December 1804
Sir

You will send me immediately Mr Carrwells Bond for the three thousand pounds, as that gentleman has paid up the Money to my Trustees who have lent the Money to Sir James Grant on a mortgage. the Security is such as they and I approve. It is therefore necessary that Mr Carrwell should have his Bond returned to him[.] let me have it when you receive this letter that I may send it to Edinbro as soon as possible.

Pray give Byron money for his Journey[.] I ever am with sincere regard

C G Byron


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Letter 41.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 29 December 1804

Since Byron had in effect been expelled from Harrow, Mrs. Byron writes to John Hanson about collecting his property. Hanson is to send the headmaster a draft of £75.18.0 to cover Byron's school debts. But Byron obtained the headmaster’s permission to return to Harrow, which he did in February.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell Decr 29th 1804
Sir

You will be so good as to tell Byron that he is very unkind not to write. I think he has paid you a sufficiently long visit and I shall expect him here soon.

I can fix on no plan for his education till we meet. I am however sure he cannot return again to Harrow. I have forced the truth from Dr Drury.

I shall this day send Dr Drury a draft on you for £75.18.0 payable the 25th March next.

Byron has left his books at Harrow[.] the value of the books I gave him is £25.0.0 besides his school books which cost a deal of money. they must all be removed. make Byron write and fix a time for his coming here. with best compts to you and Mrs Hanson I remain

Sir
your very obed servt
C G Byron


1805
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Letter 42.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 23 January 1805

Mrs. Byron requests that her son be sent from London to Southwell when a “tolerable day” returns; she is unhappy without him (he refused to go). The debtor John Palethorpe wants William Hibbert, the Newstead tenant displaced by Lord Grey de Ruthyn, removed from his house.

J Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
[Franked:] Grey de Ruthyn
Southwell 23d Jany
1805
Sir

As soon as there is a tolerable day I beg you will send Byron down. I shall be quite unhappy till I see him.

He writes me that he wishes to go to Harrow to pay his debts that there may be no reflections on his character. the amount is twenty three pounds, which you will be so good as give him for that purpose, and also money for his Journey. I have sent Dr. Drury a draft on you for £75.18.0 payable the 25th of March. when you write send me an account of what money you have given Byron that I may know what balance there will be to receive in March.

He cannot return to Harrow, and he shall not go to College yet and it will take some time to find a proper situation for him which I shall be very particular about.

Pailethorpe wishes much to have Wm. Hibbert removed from his House as he says the expence is very heavy.

with best compts to you and Mrs Hanson I remain

Sir
your very obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 43.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 8 February 1805

Mrs Byron contemplates hiring a tutor since she believes, based on what she has heard from Joseph Drury, that Lord Byron could not return to Harrow. She calculates the expenses required for him to attend Cambridge and says that she is willing to give him the whole of his £500 annual allowance, part of which she has previously been using for his other expenses. Augustus Parkyns, with whose family Byron had stayed upon coming to Nottingham in 1799, is in debtor's prison.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 8th Febry 1805
Sir,

I am well aware of all the the difficulties you mention concerning a Private Tutor but still I think they might be overcome, and I am told by all the clergy here that he is much too young to go to College.

When he does go an additional allowance must be granted, as I intend giving up the five hundred a year to him as I believe he cannot live upon less, and before he goes it will take two hundred and fifty pound to fit him for College, a hundred and fifty pounds for Furniture Plate & linen, fifty for his Wardrobe, and he must have a Horse[.] I suppose which will be fifty more.

I am sorry I cannot make him a present of all these things, but I have never been so fortunate as to procure any addition to my Pension nor any money since the sum I received from you, and I am determined not to run in debt.

I now beg I have to return you and Mrs Hanson my best thanks for your Friendship and attention to Byron.

I have drawn on you for the balance of the money which is £14.2.0[.] if Byron has received any since it will be paid in the quarter due the 25th June[.]

Yours sincerely
C G Byron
Draft to Dr Drury 75.18. 0
Money to Lord Byron 12. 0. 0
Ld Byron money to take to Harrow 23. 0. 0
balance drawn for 14. 2. 0
125. 0. 0

I hear Major Parkyns is in the [—]pray is it time[?]



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Letter 44.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 20 February 1805

Mrs. Byron is screening potential tenants to let the rabbit warren at Newstead Abbey. She hopes that the Rochdale affair will be settled before Byron comes of age; in the meanwhile his guardians must pursue the lawsuit.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 20th Febry 1805
Sir

As Mealey gives himself so many airs to People that go to speak to him, I am tormented to death, and am now about the Rabbit Warren that is to let at Newstead. Wm. Hibbert wants it, as does another man that Mealey favors who I understand has nothing. John Kirkby son to Jonathan Kirkby of Bledworth[,] a Man of some Property also wants it and has been here several times about it. You see what W Parkinson says of them[.] Mr P. is a respectable and opulent Attorney here. the young man says he has been used to a R Warren from a ?child?. the Father bought some land of Mr P. Pray send them an immediate answer. I do not see how poor Pailthorpe can go on.

I really wish the dispute in Lancashire was settled and I do not think if it proceeds no faster that it will be settled before Byron comes of age which I should be sorry for as I would not wish him to have the odium of recovering it himself, and he surely would not be so foolish as to give it up. His guardians are differently situated[;] they cannot act otherwise.

Lord Grey de Ruthyn complains much that you do not answer his letters. I remain

Sir
Your obed servt
C G Byron

It is John Kirkby son to Jonathan Kirkby of Bledworth that was the bearer of the note and it is him that wants the Newstead Warren. His Father has some Property and he can find security for the rent[.]



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Letter 45.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 26 June 1805

Mrs. Byron writes to John Hanson to adjust the terms of a previous withdrawal. She drew on him for “£80 at three months’ date,” but she wants to change it to “two months date,” payable to Messrs. Parkington, Bankers, Newark. She insists that she has the right to draw on her civil list pension quarterly if she so desires.

Southwell 26th June
1805
Sir

I wrote you yesterday that I had drawn on you for eighty pounds at three months date. I have however been obliged to alter the draft to two months date which makes it payable the 28th of August next, to Messrs Parklington & Co Bankers Newark.

If this puts you to any inconvenience I am sorry for it but I could not get it discounted at a longer date, and I have a right to receive the money quarterly if I desire it which I have never yet insisted on. I send you this letter letter in case there was any mistake about the draft which would be extremely inconvenient & unpleasant to me[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 46.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 23 September 1805

Since Mrs. Byron plans to devote all the £500 a year drawn from the Newstead trust to pay her son's college expenses, she asks the trustees for an additional £200 a year to help with her housekeeping costs. This request would be denied. She has asked Hanson's partner Samuel Birch to cover the expense of Lord Byron's journey to Farleigh Wallop, the estate of the Earl of Portsmouth where John Hanson was then staying. Byron was to go into residence at Cambridge at the end of October.

John Hanson Esqr
Southwell 23d September 1805
Sir

I received yours on the 5th[.] as to the addition I wish it was settled, but there is also a sum to be allowed for fitting my Son out for College, and I have promised him linen & & & which will be expensive and I cannot afford to make him a present of it. he also says that his apartments require considerable repairs and new furniture. it is impossible for him to fit them up out of his allowance without beginning with and continuing in debt which he wishes to avoid.

I have drawn on you for the balance due me the 29th of this month which is £11.0.0[.] and our accounts close from that date as I give up the five hundred a year to my Son from that period, and you will supply him with money accordingly. The two hundred a year addition I shall reserve for myself nor can I have less as my House will always be a home for my Son when he chooses to come to it.

I will be obliged to you to advance me fifty pounds. send it as soon as possible as I am in want of money. when the addition is granted I will draw on you for fifty pounds every quarter as I have hitherto done for the five hundred a year. With best compliments to you and Mrs Hanson I remain

Sir
Your obed servt
C G Byron
draft to Parklington & Bankers Newark 80. 0. 0
draft to Cheatham 25. 0. 0
Mr Birch advanced Lord Byron when in Town in August 9. 0. 0
draft to Cheatham 11. 0. 0
£125. 0. 0

I have given Lord Byron money for his Journey to London, but not having more money I have desired Mr Birch to give him money for his Journey to Farleigh, which you will deduct from his quarter, and I will settle with him about it.

I should imagine it will take two hundred or two hundred and fifty pounds to fit him out for College and buy him furniture.

Enclose a fifty pound Bank of England note to me as soon as possible[.]



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Letter 47.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, Esq., 23 September 1805

Mrs. Byron asks John Birch to supply Lord Byron however much money he needs for his journey to Farleigh Wallop. The Earl of Portsmouth was one of John Hanson's clients, and Byron would later be called upon to be a witness to the scandalous marriage between the mentally incompetent earl and Hanson's daughter.

Birch Esqr
Sir

You will be so good as supply Lord Byron with what money he will want for his journey to Farleigh and some few things he will want purchased in Town. I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron
Southwell 23d September


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Letter 48.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 5 October 1805

Mrs Byron has not received the £50 Bank of England note she requested 23 September, and asks John Hanson whether she may draw on him for the sum if that would be more convenient.

John Hanson Esqr
Southwell Octr 5th 1805
Sir

Pray has my Son delivered my letter to you[.] if he has I am surprised that you have not answered it and sent me the money. If you have not a Bank of England note for fifty pounds in the Country I will draw on you for fifty pounds at two months date if that is more convenient but not till I hear from you. I suppose before that time all will be settled. best compts to Mrs Hanson[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron

answer this immediately[.]



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Letter 49.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 7 October 1805

A letter has gone missing and Mrs Byron has stopped payment on the draft for £50 John Hanson had sent in lieu of the banknote she originally requested.

John Hanson Esqr
Farleigh House
nr Basingstoke
Hampshire
[Franked:] Grey de Ruthyn
Southwell 7th Octr 1805
Sir,

I never either received your letter or the draft enclosed in it. I would have answered your letter yesterday but I thought it better to send to Nottingham first to stop the payment of the draft. Let me know what I am to do for money whether I shall draw on you[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron

P.S. Let me know in your answer if the money will be lost as I have stopt the payment[.]

as Lord Grey has just sent [paper torn] I shall give his servant this letter to Fr[paper torn] as no time will be lost by it[.]



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Letter 50.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 13 October 1805

Mrs. Byron is concerned that she has only received John Hanson’s latest letter, but not the draft for £50 it was supposed to contain.

John Hanson Esqr
Farleigh House
nr Basingstoke
Hampshire
Southwell Sunday
13th Octr 1805
Dear Sir

I received your letter this day but no draft along with it. you have certainly forgot to put it in the letter, as it has no appearance of being opened. don't send any more as you see it is of no use. let me know if I may draw on you for fifty pounds. send an immediate answer and let me know if you sent the draft. if you did not forget to do it, the letter must have been opened and the draft taken out[.]

 
C. G. Byron


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Letter 51.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 6 November 1805

Mrs Byron has reason to think that Francis Boyce, the servant who delivered the letter from which the draft was missing, is less than honest and is very concerned that he is now employed by Lord Byron at Cambridge. Byron would later catch him in an act of theft and have him transported.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
[Franked:] Grey de Ruthyn
Southwell 6th Novr 1805
Sir

A circumstance has happened that gives me much uneasiness. The Servant that is now with my Son lived with me six months and I believed him to be perfectly honest. he had a good Character from his last place where he had lived six years[.] the Gentleman had taken him when a Boy. he is only now two & twenty[.] his name is Francis Boyce.

He however the very day I sent him to Nottingham to stop the payment of the draft you sent me that never arrived which was the 7th Octr, borrowed two pound from Johnson my Sons Tailor at Nottingham, as he said to buy cheese, with a promise to send the money the Saturday following.

as he did not send the money Johnson wrote to me concerning it. I immediately sent the letter to my Son at Cambridge who shoed it immediately to the Man. he told him he had sent the two pounds on the 25th Octr in a letter to Johnson. I wrote to Johnson to know if this was true and I enclose you his answer. I cannot be happy to have such a fellow about my Son as he may rob him in various ways.

Byron has however taken a fancy to him and I am afraid will not discharge him. if you think Francis intended to act dishonestly in this affair I beg you will use your influences to have him discharged.

When do you come here I have much to say that it is impossible to commit to paper[.] I remain

Sir
your sincere friend
C G Byron

P.S. You may be sure I know nothing of all this till after he left Southwell. if I had he never should have gone into my Sons Service—

Write soon—



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Letter 52.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 25 December 1805

Mrs. Byron draws on John Hanson for £50 to pay George Butler, Joseph Drury's successor as headmaster at Harrow—with whom her son had quarreled and then made up. She sends Lord Byron's London address, which is that of Elizabeth Massingberd from whom she had previously let rooms.

Mr Hanson
Southwell Decr 25th 1805
Sir

I will be obliged to you to allow me to give Dr. Butler a draft on you at three months date from this day for fifty pounds. surely things will be settled before that time. if I hear nothing from you to the contrary in the days I shall conclude you have no objection, and send the Doctor the draft[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron

Byron is now at No 16 Piccadilly near Hyde Park Corner[.]



1806
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Letter 53.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 11 January 1806

Mrs Byron has drawn on John Hanson for £50, but not for the Harrow expenses. Prothero prints a passage possibly missing from this letter, as it is to Hanson and of the same date: "The Bills are coming in thick upon me to double the amount I expected; he went and ordered just what he pleased here, at Nottingham, and in London. However, it is of no use to say anything about it, and I beg you will take no notice. I am determined to have everything clear within the year, if possible" Letters and Journals (1898) 1:95n.

Mr Hanson
Southwell Janry 11th 1806
Sir

I have drawn on you for fifty pounds, but not in favor of Dr. Butler as I find it more convenient to give him a draft on Mr ?Gernon?.

I wrote you some time ago that I would draw on you for fifty pounds payable on the 26th March, if I heard nothing to the contrary. I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron
Draft to Mr ?Lathing? 9. 7. 0
Do to Mr Burrows 7.17. 0
Do to Mr Cheatham 32.16. 0
£50. 0. 0


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Letter 54.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 29 January 1806

John Hanson reports that he has seen Lord Byron, regrets the dishonesty of his servant, and fears that Byron's £500 yearly allowance is not sufficient for his present style of living. So far was Byron from living within the "prudent Bounds" Hanson speaks of that he was even then contracting ruinous loans with his landlady Elizabeth Massingberd as a way of becoming financially independent of his mother.

 
Dear Madam

I have for some time past been a very great Invalid which has in a great Measure been ye Cause of my Silence but thank God I am now much better[.]As you mentioned I presume you have drawn on me for £50 in favor of Dr. Butler but if you have not you are at perfect Liberty to do so[.]

I have seen Lord Byron several Times and with respect to his Servant my Interference I am sorry to say, will have little ?merit.? It is a Pity a New Market Servant should have been fixed upon for his Lordship and still more so that his Allowance should have been put under such an Arrangement as it has. The Allowance ought to have gone thro ye Medium of his Tutor, but I fear it is now too late to make any Alteration. I could wish you would send the Bill for his Table and Bed Linen as I much wish now to get his Allowance fixed. I dont see how it is possible he can live in his present Stile with any Thing like 500£ a Year but I hope his Lordship's good Sense will be the means of keeping him within prudent Bounds[.] I should hope you would not take any Notice of what I say for if any Advice I can give him is to have any Effect I must retain his Confidence & I think I can at times introduce it with some Effect[.]



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Letter 55.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 1 March 1806

Concerned with Lord Byron's current state of affairs, Mrs. Byron fears that her son has gotten himself into trouble. She asks John Hanson draw out of him why he is contemplating leaving England and where his recently-acquired money has been coming from.

J Hanson Esq
No 6 Chancery Lane London
[Franked:] Grey de Ruthyn
Sir

I beg you will not mention to my Son having heard from me but try to get out of him his reason for wishing to leave England, and where he got the money. I much fear he has got into bad hands, not only with regard to money matters but in other respects. my idea is that he has inveigled himself with some Woman that he wishes to get rid of and finds it difficult.

But whatever it is he must be got out of it, but pray do not mention that you have any suspicion but draw it out of him. If you think my letter will be of any use put a Wafer in it and send it to the twopenny Post office[.]

Yours sincerely
C G Byron


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Letter 56.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 4 March 1806

Mrs. Byron has discovered that her son has indeed been borrowing money and is furious.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London

That Boy will be the death of me, or drive me mad. I never will consent to his going abroad. where can he get hundreds[.] has he got into the hands of money lenders. he has no feeling no heart[;] this I have long known[.] he has behaved as ill as possible to me for years back. the bitter truth I can no longer conceal[.] it is wrung from me by heart rending agony. I am well rewarded[.] I came to Nottinghamshire to please him and now he hates it. he knows that I am doing every thing in my power to pay his debts and he writes to me about his Servants, and the last time he wrote to me was to desire to send him £25.0.0 to pay his Harrow debts which I would have done if I had had as much, as he has these hundred. I am glad I did not, but it shows what he is.

God knows what is to be done with him. I much fear he is already ruined, at eighteen!!! great God I am distracted[.]

I can say no more[.]

C G B.


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Letter 57.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson

Mrs Byron instructs John Hanson to pay Byron's quarterly allowance of £125.0.0.

Mr Hanson
Southwell 18th March
1806
Dr Sir

You may pay my Son the quarters allowance a £125.0.0 that will be due the 25th of this month[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 58.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 18 March 1806

Writing on the same date, Mrs. Byron complains that she has not received funds from the Court of Chancery to pay the land taxes due, and advises her solicitor not to advance Lord Byron money unless for a good purpose.

Mr Hanson
Southwell 18th March 1806
Dr Sir

I hope you have arrived safe in Town. I never have received any money to cover the land Tax & & & I am sure as your friend is now in the Treasury[.] if you can be of any service to me you will. I certainly would not give the money to Byron if it was not to answer some good purpose[.] I remain

yours sincerely
C G Byron


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Letter 59.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 26 March 1806

Angry with her son who is refusing to return to Cambridge or to return home, Mrs. Byron retracts her order of the previous week to pay Lord Byron his quarterly allowance.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 26th March 1806
Dr Sir

I will no longer submit to insults and abuse from a Boy. if it were possible to die of grief he would kill me.

I desire you will not pay his allowance till you see me or hear from me again. if he is not here in two days from this date I come to London. he shall know he is not yet his own Master

Yours sincerely
C G Byron


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Letter 60.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 31 March 1806

Lord Byron may receive his quarterly allowance on the condition that he return to Cambridge after the Easter term. Hanson later informed Byron that the Court of Chancery can deny him his allowance at his mother's discretion.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
[Franked:] Grey de Ruthyn
Southwell 31st March 1806
Sir

If my Son Lord Byron wishes to have his quarter allowance, £125.0.0 due the 25th of this Month, you may pay it to him on condition only that he will return to Cambridge after the Easter term, which I am determined that he shall do[.] I remain

Sir
your obed sert
C G Byron


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Letter 61.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 21 April 1806

Mrs. Byron owes the firm, Mipes, Mather & Mandall £25 and draws upon Hanson for another £25 because she is in want of money to pay bills. Chancery has still not granted the addition to her income necessitated by giving the whole of his £500 allowance for college expenses, reducing her overall income.

Southwell 21st April 1806
Dr Sir

I have been under the necessity of sending Mipes Mather & Mandall a draft on you for twenty pounds payable the 25th June next, and as I want money I shall be obliged to draw on you for the balance twenty five pounds more payable the same date. I always reckon on fifty pound a quarter being allowed me by the court of Chancery which I cannot go on without. the sum I have had of you since the the 29th September 1805 is one hundred pounds and these drafts will make it one hundred and fifty pounds from the 29th Sept 1805 to the 25th June 1806 which makes three quarters.

And till the additional allowance is granted I cannot repay you. Pray is it never to be settled.

I also wish you to send me the money to pay the bills I sent you some time ago. Certainly could I have forseen that it would be so long before things were settled I would not have got any thing for my Son, or allowed him to go to College till a proper allowance was granted. I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron
Cheatham's bill £54. 1. 6
Wright's bill 8.12. 6
Fletcher's bill 19. 5. 9
£81.19. 9
pd by Mrs Byron for making two dozen & eight shirts at 2/6 each £4. 0. 0
total £85.19. 9


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Letter 62.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 24 April 1806

Mrs. Byron received an £80 bill from Gray of Bond Street for plate and silverware—a sum much beyond what she had allowed for or what the Court of Chancery would cover as "legitimate" expenses. He has also purchased a carriage for his mother which she has refused to accept.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 24th April 1806
Dr Sir

This day had a letter from Grey in Bond Street wherein he mentions that my Son had got Plate to the value of eighty pounds, and that he informed him that I would pay for it.

The real state of the case is this, when it was settled that he was to go to Cambridge I understood from my Son, and others, that some plate would be necessary and I did order a few articles which I shall put down on the other side, but merely confined myself to what I thought would be necessary, which you know I wrote to you concerning and I did not doubt nor do I doubt but that the Court of Chancery will allow it as the sum cannot amount to more than twenty five pounds[.] perhaps not to so much. that I ordered I shall be answerable for[.] The balance Grey must look to himself for, and I have desired him to send you the bill, that you may give it in with the other accounts which I sent you.

Lord Byron has given £31.10.0 to Pitts Stake, he has also bought a Carriage which he says was intended for me which I refused to accept of being in hopes it would stop his having one[.]

Yours sincerely
C G Byron

Plate ordered by Mrs Byron for Lord Byron at Mr Greys Bond Street—

6 table spoons
6 table forks
6 desert spoons
6 tea spoons
a sugartongs

No more was ordered by Mrs Byron which was in writing from Southwell and Lord Byron must himself have ordered the other articles when in London before he went to Cambridge[.]



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Letter 63.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 5 May 1806

Mrs Byron is having difficulties meeting expenses: her civil list pension, reduced when Byron went to college, is in arrears, she has yet to be granted the additional £200 she had requested from the Chancery Court managing the Newstead funds, and she has not received from Hanson money to pay the land tax on the estate.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 5th May 1806
Dr Sir

I have drawn on you this day for twenty five pounds, and on the 21st April for the same sum, in all from the 29th Sept 1805 makes one hundred and fifty pounds received from you, fifty by draft on Smith & Co Notts, the other hundred I have drawn on you for.

There is two things to settle which can at all make my mind easy, or my circumstances comfortable. the one is the paying up the arrears of the civil list which you have nothing to do with. the other is in your power, to get my business settled with the Court of Chancery, the additional allowance granted and also the sums to pay what was got to fit My Son out for Cambridge.

As to the money I was promised to cover the land Tax & & & of the Pension I never expect to be so fortunate as to get it[.] I remain,

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 64.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, 20 September 1806

Mrs. Byron writes to John Birch, Hanson’s partner, to complain that her solicitor has stopped responding to letters. She is checking up on Hanson’s progress with the Rochdale case: after he had won a technical victory one of the defendants, James Dearden, was making an appeal. She would like to know at which court—either Chancery or King's Bench—the case would be conducted—it would eventually be taken to the King's Bench court.

Mr Birch
Southwell Nott 20th Sept 1806
Sir

I have wrote to Mr Hanson repeatedly[.] I do not know where he is nor can I get any answer from him.

I send you a paragraph out from the Sun. for God sake what are these points of Law reserved. My Son & I are rather uneasy about it.

In your letter you mentioned something concerning the Court of Chancery. Mr Hanson in his mentioned the Court of Kings Bench[.] Pray what Court does it come before & when. favor me with a early answer[.]

I remain
Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron

Send the enclosed to the Twopenny Post—



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Letter 65.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, 10 December 1806

Mrs. Byron again consults with Mr. Birch about the status of the Rochdale verdict. James Dearden, a principal agent in the case, had won a stay against the earlier ruling in favor of Byron while the trial continued. She asks Mr. Birch what to do if the case is appealed to the Court of Chancery or if Byron should lose, as he is in sore need of revenue from Rochdale. Hanson had estimated that Rochdale would produce £30,000 per year of income.

Mr Birch
Southwell Decr 10th 1806
Sir

As Mr Hanson is rather dilatory in answering letters, I must request an early answer from you to this.

I understand that the Court of Kings Bench has granted the Roachdale People a Rule to show cause why the verdicts obtained in Lord Byrons favor should not be set aside.

Mr Hanson says he hopes they will not ultimately succeed tho' they might have taken stronger grounds.

Now I wish to know when the next term is and if it will be settled then, and if it is decided against them whether they will carry it before the Court of Chancery, and in case Lord Byron should loose it what he ought to do. I mean to ask whether he can do any thing or if he must abide by the decision.

and also to know if the granting a rule to show Cause is much against my Son, or if it is a matter of course in that Court, and what you expected. An early answer to all these questions will much oblige

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron

Lord Byron means to draw very soon for the hundred and twenty five pounds due to him the 25th this month[.] and I mean to draw for fifty pounds due me at the same time.

I hope Lord Byron will have the opinion and assistance of the best Lawyers in London[.] certainly Garrow ought to be consulted[.] pray what is the grounds the Rochdale People go on[.]



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Letter 66.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, 22 December 1806

Mrs. Byron writes to Samuel Birch again. Lord Byron asks to draw his quarterly allowance. She herself draws £50.

Mr Birch
Southwell 22d Decr 1806
Sir

Lord Byron has drawn on you this day for the sum of one hundred & twenty five pound, being the quarter allowance due him the 25th of this Month.

I have also drawn this day for the fifty pounds due me at the same time[.] I remain

Sir
C G Byron


1807
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Letter 67.   Catherine Byron to John Birch, 31 January 1807

Mrs. Byron has been made aware of a pending transaction between Lord Byron and Mrs. Massingberd. She is acting again as a joint security in order to procure £3,000 through money lenders; her son would owe £5,000 upon his coming of age in two years. She is doing what she can to stop this.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Private
Jany 31st 1807
Dear Sir

Mrs M is now trying to get my Son into another scrape[.] that is to borrow more money. she is certainly a Dupe herself or wishes to make him one. I know her income has been seized for the payment of the annuity, and she wishes Ld B. to allow her to borrow money to pay all off[.] which is to be procured on worse terms than the former loan[,] but upon these conditions that he will have to pay nothing till he comes of age[,] that is to say that she will have nothing to pay for him. therefore she will enjoy her income till that period, and then all will fall heavy on his Lordship.

I don't know of whom she is to promise the money, but nothing is concluded yet. therefore if you could take any steps to prevent it you would oblige me much. my name must not appear as I am supposed to know nothing of the transaction. do not answer this letter but burn it. I hope it will not fall into any Persons hands but your own. if you can do any thing to prevent this transaction it will make me happy[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron

P.S. The People the last sum was borrowed on have wrote to her Granddaughter to desire Mrs M. income may only be paid to them. I believe the People are Kings & & &.

Mrs M. wishes this new affair to be concluded by the 12th of Febry[.]

I suppose you received some letters from me in Septr last on this subject—



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Letter 68.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 7 March 1807

Mrs. Byron writes to John Hanson in need of money to pay the bill, due since October 1805, for her son’s expenses in setting up rooms at Cambridge, a sum not including what was due to Gray’s of Bond Street. She complains that her solicitor is making no progress on her request for the additional £200 allowance to cover her expenses.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 7th March
Sir

I desire you will remit me the £85.19.6 to pay the bills so long due (since Octr 1805)[.] if you do not I shall be under the necessity of drawing on you for that sum, and I am determined to be no more teased & dunned about it, and it certainly is not reasonable to suppose people in trade can remain so long without being paid[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron

as to any thing being settled with the Court of Chancery[.] I suppose Byron will be of age before any additional allowance is granted or the money to pay these bills & & & allowed, a period I really cannot wait for[.]



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Letter 69.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 March 1807

Mrs. Byron will draw on Hanson for her son’s college expenses, and will repay him if the charge is not allowed by the Court of Chancery.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 17th March 1807
Dr Sir

I really think the Rochdale People give trouble merely for the sake of tormenting, and I fancy they are rendered desperate from the idea of being obliged to give up the Property.

It will be very hard on me if the Court doesn't allow the £85.19.6[.] however that may be I shall draw on you for the sum immediately at one months date, and I will engage to repay you if it is not allowed. My Son joins in best regards to you & Mrs Hanson[.] I remain

Dr Sir
your sincere friend
C G Byron

There is also the Plate to be thought of—



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Letter 70.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 19 March 1807

Mrs Byron writes that she will be ruined if she is not repaid for her son’s college expenses. Lord Byron has been with his mother for seven months at Burgage Manor in Southwell and she is not enthusiastic about his returning to Cambridge where he did nothing but drink, gamble, and spend money. His latest attempt to borrow money with Mrs. Massingberd has come to nothing.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Private
Southwell 19th March 1807
Dr Sir

When I last wrote it was rather in a hurry. I have now to inform you that if the Court of Chancery do not grant the £85.19.6 and also the two hundred a year I shall be perfectly ruined. I certainly never would have got the things had I had the least idea that they would not be paid for.

Lord Byron has now been with me seven months with two men servants for which I have never received one farthing as he requires the five hundred a year for himself. therefore it is impossible I can keep him and them out of my small income[:] four hundred a year, two in Scotland and the Pension is now reduced to two hundred a year. but if the Court allows the additional two hundred a year I shall be perfectly satisfied.

I do not know what to say about Byrons returning to Cambridge[.] when he was there I believe he did nothing but drink gamble & spend money. the affair with Mrs M. is entirely off as he could not have the money on the terms offered[.] I remain

Sir
your obed servt
C G Byron


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Letter 71.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 11 April 1807

John Hanson was apparently moved to act; the Chancery Court has agreed to pay the £85.19.6 for college expenses. Mrs. Bryon and her son draw on Hanson, and for their quarterly allowances, due on the 25th of June. Mrs. Byron wishes Hanson would pay Lord Byron's outstanding bill from the jewellers Robert and William Gray of New Bond Street.

Mr Hanson
Southwell 11th April 1807
Dr Sir

I have drawn on you for the £85.19.6 allowed me by the Master which is the same I have paid for Lord Byron. I have also drawn on you for another quarter due me the 25th June next fifty pounds. Lord Byron mentions drawing on you soon for his quarters allowance £125.0.0 due the 25th June. I wish Grays bill for the Plate could be paid[.]

I remain
yours sincerely
C G Byron

This Draft paid by Mr. Birch's Drt on Dawson's[.] J H[.]



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Letter 72.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 29 April 1807

In an effort to keep her son out of the hands of the money-lenders, Mrs Byron has made herself security for loans to her son from Nottingham acquaintances to the amount of a thousand pounds. The lenders were his old acquaintances Frances Byron and Frances Parkyns, and the Southwell banker William Wylde. Lord Byron has told the Parkyns that he is unable to pay off the loans, putting his mother in considerable difficulty.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Private
Southwell 29th April 1807
Dear Sir,

The enclosed letter speaks for itself. My Son being very anxious to procure money[.] I did offer to be security for him to the amount of a thousand pounds, wishing to keep him out of the hands of money lenders. there is some risk to me if his life is not ensured. knowing that Mrs Byron & the Miss Parkyn's had sold their Estates I asked them to lend the money on my Bond, and you see their last letter. it is rather placing you in an awkward situation, as I really do not see what you can do in the business and from that conviction I would not have wrote you on the subject if Lord Byron had not wished it.

I have rather changed my opinion concerning this transaction lately, as Byron from their last letter gave up all hopes of getting the money and behaved very well on the occasion, and proposed selling his Horses and plans of economy that I much fear will be laid aside if the money is procured. my only motive for wishing it was to keep him clear of the Jews, but at present he does not seem at all disposed to have any thing to do with them even if he is disappointed in this resource[.]

I wish to act for the best but God knows what is the best. send an answer & one that I can show him[.] I remain

Dr Sir
yours sincerely
C G Byron

What are you doing with the Rochdale People—



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Letter 73.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 23 May 1807

In what appears to be a draft—the letter is not signed—John Hanson refuses to become involved in Lord Byron's Nottingham loans.

23 May 1807
Dear Madam

I have been in Hampshire and returned only last Night and this is the only Apology I have to offer for your being so long without an Ansr to your Letter[.] Mrs Byron and Miss Parkyns are certainly in an Error in supposing that I am guardian to Lord Byron and what I can have to do in the proposed Negotiation I am wholly at a loss for to know. Byron should exercise his own Discretion. I don't think that I can interfere in it[.] indeed it would be officious in me to do so[.] My miserable Opinion of Lord Byron's good Sense induces me to think that his Lordship will be of Opinion that I ought not to have been referred to upon such an Occasion—



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Letter 74.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 24 May 1807

Around Easter of 1807 James Dearden had appealed John Hanson's successful ruling obtained in the Lancashire courts, and the Rochedale case would next proceed to the Exchequer Court.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Southwell 24th May 1807
Dear Sir

Much uneasiness and vexation does this Rochdale business give me. I am very sorry they have it in their power to keep my Son so long out of possession. I had no idea of the Court of Exchequer, but always thought of the Court of Chancery. pray will the trial come on soon or will it be protracted, and if they fail there can they bring it into Chancery after all, or if they succeed what must his Lordship do in that case. must he abide by the decision is there no redress. Pray have the goodness to answer all these questions as soon as possible. Byron joins me in best regards[.]

I remain
Dr Sir
yours sincerely
C G Byron


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Letter 75.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 9 August 1807

John Hanson reassures Mrs. Byron that Dearden and his co-defendants can protract the Rochedale suit as long as they please, but that they will eventually lose and have to pay the court costs. An equity suit would be pursued in the Court of Chancery where the common law did not necessarily apply. Miss Launder, the not-so-young former tenant of Newstead Abbey, has married an illegitimate son of the second baron Grantley, apparently then going by the name of Harvey.

Honble Mrs Byron
Southwell
Nottinghamshire
 
Dear Madam

The Drafts which you have apprized me of having drawn upon me for the Quarters Allowance that will become due at Michs next shall be duly honored. I had the Pleasure of seeing Lord Byron about ten Days[.] he was then very well and in very excellent Spirits[.] I was surprized to see him so altered. he has reduced himself in Bulk very much but I hope he has not done it to ye Injuring of his Health[.] I was greatly rejoiced to find that his Lordship had been at Cambridge and that it was his Intention to renew his Studies there[.] I am sure it will redound much to his Credit to continue there another Year[.] I intend being at Newstead very shortly but I cannot fix the Time until the Chancellor has finished his Sittings. I think I told you the Rochdale People had mistated a Suit in Equity agt us which hangs up our Judgments upon ye late Trials. they will have Recourse to every Expedient the Law will allow to keep Possession till the latest Time, and it is a Commendable Thing that the Law will allow them to do it, but I trust they will ultimately pay dearly for it. first, I have Persons employed to keep an Account of all the Costs they get that we may be able to charge them ultimately with all the Profits upon them[.] Mrs Hanson unites with me in best thoughts and believe me Dear Madam

Yr most faithful servt
John Hanson
Chancery Lane 9th Aug. 1807

PS
I suppose you have heard of Miss U. Launder's Marriage to Mr Harvey a Protegeé of Ld. Grantleys



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Letter 76.   Lord Byron to Elizabeth Massingberd, [Fall 1807?]

This unsigned and undated letter, apparently in the handwriting of Catherine Byron, appears to be a copy of a letter which Lord Byron sent to his landlady Elizabeth Massingberd with whom he had been borrowing against annuities. Since a second loan was under consideration in the Spring of 1807 and the letter mentions a half-year payment on a second loan, perhaps the letter dates from the autumn of 1807. It is possible that Mrs Massingberd, a Nottingham woman from whom Mrs Byron rented rooms in London in 1802, would confide in Mrs Byron—she knew from someone what was going on—and that Mrs Byron would keep a copy of the document.

On the other side I state your calculation which is certainly a mistake, and I also state the sum I shall really have to pay when I come of age. you know I left a sufficient sum in your hands to pay both annuitys for two years and all other expences included.

Mrs M. state of the account—

first annuity £600. 0. 0
second £110. 0. 0
redemption 150. 0. 0
original sum 3300. 0. 0
£4160. 0. 0

yet you calculate these sums at four thousand and seven hundred & sixty pounds, as you make in your letter £860 to be £1450[.]

Lord B state of the account—

original sum £3300. 0. 0
first annuity for the past year 300. 0. 0
first annuity for the past half year 125. 0. 0
£3725. 0. 0


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Letter 77.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 21 December 1807

In an unusually amiable letter John Hanson reports that Lord Grey de Ruthyn's tenure at Newstead Abbey is coming to end so that Lord Byron, who has returned to Cambridge, can be in residence when he comes of age. His half-sister Augusta Byron has married George Leigh, the son of Mrs Byron's sister-in-law and former correspondent Frances Leigh.

Honble Mrs Byron
Southwell
Nottinghamshire
 
Dear Madam

Lord Greys Term at Newstead will expire next Midsummer[.] I purposely limited it to that Period in order that it might be open to Lord Byron when he came of Age the January following[.] It is impossible to say when the Trial of Lancashire Matter will come on in the Court of Exchequer[.] they have it in their Power to procrastinate it very much and I make no doubt they will avail themselves of it to the utmost[.] Some Engagements from Home have prevented my giving you an earlyer Ansr to your Inquiries on these Subjects.

Was you not rather surprized at Mrs Byrons marriage[?] I had supposed it to be entirely broken off and indeed I believe she had intended to go to Castle Howard. Lord Byron I am truly rejoiced to find continues at Cambridge. he will soon be in a Situation to become of use to his Country, which stands much in need of such Abilities as he so eminently possesses, and I hope and trust, he will turn them to that Account[.] Mrs Hanson and all my Family are well. She unites with me in the best [Company] Compts and wishing you the Compliments of ye approaching Season believe me[.] Dr Madam

Yours very sincerely
John Hanson
Chy Lane 21st Dec 1807

P.S. Your Draft will of course be duly attended to.



1808
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Letter 78.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 26 May 1808

John Hanson informs Mrs. Byron of the status the Rochdale lawsuit. She should not trust Mr. Shaw, a solicitor who had formerly worked for their opponents. Hanson is working to overturn a ruling permitting the mining to continue while the suit proceeds. The defendant, John Dearden, has sworn in court that the valuable collieries were not worth more than £100 a year. (The Court of Equity mentioned would by the Chancery Court.) Hanson engages to visit Newstead Abbey in July, though in the event he would not come until October when he would begin preparations for Lord Byron's coming of age.

The Honble Mrs Byron
Southwell
Nottinghamshire
 
Dear Madam

I am indebted to Lord Byron's Candour for the Perusal of a Letter which his Lordship has received from you on the Subject of Rochdale Concerns and on which it is necessary for me to reply[.]

I am not at all surprised at what Mr Shaw has represented to you but I must beg to caution you against his Statements as they cannot be depended upon. I have already been deceived by them and if I had given Credit to his Representations your Son would have been involved in endless Suits which must have involved every farthing of his Fortune and had he died under Age it must have fallen upon you.

Mr Shaw has been ye sole and confidential Advisor of the very Persons who are resisting Lord Byrons Claims. they have quarreled with him and thought right to dismiss him and there cannot be a doubt but he is actuated by Revenge against them. he is not more favourable to me because I would not appoint him Steward and because I objected to his Charges for some trifling Business he did[.] in short Madam his Accounts are too chimerical to deserve the smallest of attention and I again caution you against listening to them.

Mr Dearden & his Patrons had obtained an Injunction to restrain the Verdicts we had obtained[.] Nothing more could be done than to have an Account kept of the Quantities of Coals gotten by them that we might be able to resort to these for the Value of them in case the Court of Equity should confirm the Verdicts[.] This I ordered to be done and if I had gone down every Month to Rochdale it is I could have done. I am taking all the Measures I can to get rid of the Injunction and I am in hopes I shall be able soon to do it. I intended going to Rochdale this summer and to have devoted a full week there in order to arrange Things and I still [paper torn] Mr Dearden will have to [paper torn] Profits he has made from the [paper torn] he is very rich and able to answer it. I got into Discredit in acting upon Mr Shaw's Information the Particulars of which are too long to detail in a Letter but suffice it for ye present to say that when Mr Dearden was examined in Court he swore that ye Collieries were not worth 100£ a year and the Court believed him.

I shall go to Rochdale the first Week in July probably sooner and will make a Point of calling upon you in my way thither as I have many [remainder missing]



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Letter 79.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 28 May 1808

Mrs. Byron assures John Hanson that, whatever his character, Mr Shaw is to be believed and that the Rochedale properties are far more valuable than even Hanson thinks. Time would prove her correct; the fifth Lord Byron had squandered a fortune in letting them go so cheaply.

Southwell 28th May 1808
Sir

I make no doubt Mr Shaw is a very great Rascal or his information would have been given sooner, but Rogues are often useful, and it is my opinion that he is the Person in the world most likely to know the real value of Lord Byrons Lancashire Property and this I believe for the same reason you give for doubting his veracity, namely his having been employed by the People now resisting Lord Byrons claims, and they having quarreled with him (which was very unwise in them) the truth will now most probably come out, and he certainly knows the real state of affairs if he will be candit.

Nor do I think Mr Deardens having perjured himself in a court of justice (which I firmly believe he did) a sufficient reason for altogether discrediting Shaws account. pray let me ask you if it is consistent with common sense to believe that Dearden and his Partners would throw away thousands (which they have done) in the deffence of a property not worth a hundred a year!!! impossible for my part[.] I never will swallow such inconsistent nonsense. (Mr Dearden I suppose forgot when he swore this) that one hundred Colliers were daily employed in getting Coals, and double the number in getting stone flags & slate.

I shall not be at all satisfied till you (or if you are not able) Mr Birch goes down to Lancashire to ascertain the real value of this property which ought to have been done long since. Mr Shaw has had a good opportunity of knowing the value of it, and the truth or falsehood of his account may certainly be easily ascertained, and he says the property not sold will be eight thousand a year, and that what is now disputed Dearden & his Partners clear four thousand a year by. I do not altogether depend on this statement nor do I wholly disbelieve it, but I recollect the old proverb set a thief to catch a thief[.] who is more capable of giving accurate information concerning the situation of an army than a Deserter and Shaw certainly knows the truths of Dearden & his Partners in ingenuity, and that mans character is so infamous that he is not intitled to the smallest credit even where his own interest is not concerned[.] you say Dearden will be obliged to account for the Profits he has made from the Coals[.] no doubt, if it is possible to come to the knowledge of what these profits are[,] but are his Partners able to refund. I understand from Shaw that the depredations are chiefly commited on the unsold Property.

Your own clerk gave much the same account of the value of the property to Mealey when he was at Newstead on his return from Lancashire, and he also told Lord Byron nearly the same thing (I don't know where he had his information) but be this as it may, depend on it the property is of more value than you are aware of, indeed a noble Peer from that Country says it is invaluable if property managed, which it has never yet been[.] however when you go down, hear Shaws, Deardens, & Mealeys account, but trust neither as I am informed they are all Rogues alike, but listen to impartial People (if they are to be found) and hear, see, & judge for yourself. Mr Dearden is the greatest scoundrel on Earth and capable of perjury or any other villany that suits his purpose. the character given of him is from the report of a Lancashire Lady whos Father he cheated out of property to a large amount. she lives here & will tell you all the particulars when you arrive if you wish to hear it. Nothing could exceed her joy when she heard Lord Byron had obtained a verdict, merely because she hates Dearden and by all accounts she has just cause so to do.

I remain


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Letter 80.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 28 July 1808

John Hanson, busy in Chancery Court, postpones his visit to Nottinghamshire until August. Lord Grey de Ruthyn will stop paying rent for Newstead as of midsummer.

Chancery Lane 28th July 1808
Madam

I shall be at Rochdale early in August but I cannot fix the precise Day as it depends upon the Proceedings in the Chancery Cause which I wish to have decided before I go down. I am doing my utmost to get ye main Question decided, during the present Sittings, and I hope I shall be able to accomplish it, when my Business at Rochdale will be more effectually done and I shall devote sufficient Time to go thro' it[.] I shall certainly take Southwell in my way and will let you know a few Days before I set off.

I should have written to you before but was very unwell and obliged to leave Town for a short Time but ye Business in Chancery has not stood still on that Account.

Lord Grey has given up Newstead and pays ye Rent to Midsummer last[.] I am Madam

Your humble servt
John Hanson


1809
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Letter 81.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 13 March 1809

On the 22nd of January Lord Byron had come of age and was preparing to go abroad leaving behind debts amounting to something like £12,000—for several years he had been living like a lord on an annual allowance of £500. In this letter John Hanson reports that he has completed the genealogical documentation required for Byron to take his seat in the House of Lords. Byron intends to repay the loans for which his mother was the security out of the money due to him upon coming of age. Since this was not sufficient to cover his debts, discussions were under way about mortgages and the sale of properties.

My dear Madam

Altho' Lord Byron has involved himself certainly to a very considerable Extent his Lordship goes too for when he says that he is ruined for he possesses from his Rank and Abilities the Means of redeeming himself whenever he can bring himself to the Resolution to do so and I think he will soon do it and I verily believe he will do it effectually when he turns his Mind to it[.] I do assure you I have not been wanting in giving him all the Advice I am able which I am happy to say he takes in very good Part tho I should like it better if he would follow it more[.]

I have great Pleasure in telling you we have got over our Difficulties with the Lord Chancellor[.] his Lordship required Guidance from Cornwall of the Reputation of Adm Byron's Marriage and I was under the Necessity of sending a Person down on purpose to procure it and we were fortunate to discover an old Man at Carhais who was present at the celebration of the Marriage. This satisfied the Chancellor, and I had yesterday the Satisfaction to present Lord Byron with the Writ to call him to his Seat, and I believe he intends taking it Tomorrow. I am truly glad we got this for I confess I was very much afraid the Chancellor would have returned the Matter to a Committee of Privileges which would have been tedious and cost at least 1500£[.]

Lord Byron did mention to me his Intention of asking you to consent to his receiving the £4000 or so much of it as would be left after accommodating you with as much as you wanted and if this is done his Lordship ought certainly to make you as secure as possible and that can only be done by changing it by way of Mortgage upon a Part of Newstead Estate and it will be best to pledge two or three of the Farms. let me know if this meets with your Approbation and I think the sooner Notice is given for paying in the Money the better. I believe it is his Lordships Intention to take upon himself the Payment of the £1000 which was advanced by Mrs G Byron and I will get his Lordships Intentions to allow me to prepare the necessary Bond which I hope will be thought a sufficient Security[.] There is about £3000 in Court arising from Savings which will be paid his Lordship in the course of a short Time and I make no doubt he will then discharge many of his small Debts and particularly those at Southwell which certainly ought to be paid[.] I can assure you I am very much averse to his paying those rascally Usurers one Farthing more than he received from them and here I cannot help condemning in the severest Terms the Conduct of Mrs Massingberd who so much encouraged him in the incurring of them. I am in hopes we shall be able to come to an Arrangement with the Rochdale People[.] I wish very much that his Lordship would go down with me Newstead this Spring when he should probably be able to put on End to that Business and I am inclined to think he will[.] I wish his Lordship to bring his Mind to Business but I incline to think he means soon to adopt the Course you have recommended.

I am thank God much better in Health and tho' some of our young ones have been very ill they are now reviving and have discarded the Doctor for the Cook. I sincerely hope you are better[.] Mrs Hanson unites with me in best Regards and believe me My dear Madam

Yr truly faithful servt
John Hanson
Chancery Lane
13th March 1809


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Letter 82.   Catherine Byron to John Musters, 22 September 1809

This is the draft of a furious letter Mrs Byron wrote to John Musters, a Nottinghamshire neighbor who had been illegally hunting on the Newstead estate. Musters was the husband of Byron's early love, the former Mary Anne Chaworth.

Newstead Abbey 22d Septr 1809 
Sir

I must insist on your confining yourself to your own premises, or at least not coming on Lord Byrons Manor to hunt and commit trespasses, which you have been so long in the habit of doing that you now I suppose fancy you have a right to do so. but I am fully determined to convince you to the contrary. Pray Sir do you suppose that I will here and tamely submit to every insult from you? if you think so you will find yourself extremely mistaken. I cannot send out my Keeper but he must be abused by you on Lord Byrons own Manor[.] You presume on his absence to insult a Woman and assault an old Man, that is you insult his Mother & injure the Property attack the Persons and threaten the lives of his Servants. In short your language is unbecoming and your behavior totally unworthy a Man of Courage. These are hard truths but they are truths nevertheless.

I will now take the trouble to inform you that Lord Byrons Tenants shall be no longer annoyed by you with impunity but that a prosecution will be immediately instituted against you for divers Trespasses, and one assault[.] You are not surely so ignorant as not to know that breaking down fences and riding through fields of standing corn with your Hounds, are most unlawful unjustifiable arbitrary and oppressive, and will never be submitted to in a free country, even if you was the first Man in it. I will not suffer my Keeper to be abused or interrupted in the execution of his duty, and he has my positive orders to use every possible means to destroy the Foxes. Lord Grey de Ruthyns poaching and these abundant noxious Animals has nearly deprived this once excellent Manor of game, and the woods on this Estate shall not continue to be a Depot for your vermine, and I am determined to extirpate the breed here and to suffer so great a nuisance no longer, and if the breed of Fox-hunters could be as easily got rid of, benefit to society in general would be great. no earths shall be stopt at Newstead as I shall encourage neither foxes nor their hunters on these Premises. very extraordinary conduct for a Justice of the peace, to break the peace!!! The earths I understand have been stopt and whoever can be found at that work shall have sufficient cause to repent it and care shall be taken to watch for them[.] I remain

Sir
& & & C G Byron


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Letter 83.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 26 September 1809

Mrs Byron, who had moved into Newstead Abbey when Lord Byron went abroad, was attempting to retrench by reducing the staff and raising rents. John Hanson approves of her proposals and will have the estate revalued. Byron’s Nottinghamshire loans, for which his mother had stood security, had not been paid off when he went abroad, and Hanson broaches the option that they be reimbursed out of Mrs Byron’s small personal estate, offering Newstead income as her security. In the meantime, the interest on the Southwell bank loan can by paid out of the Newstead rents since Hanson now has the authority to manage Byron’s accounts.

Honble Mrs Byron
Newstead Abbey
Nottingham
 My dear Madam

I have the pleasure to inform you that I have received a Letter from Lord Byron dated from Gibraltar the 7th of last Month and he was then very well and wrote in good Spirits[.] he says he had just ridden between 4 and 500.d Miles around the Country from Lisbon to Cadiz and has gone there by Sea to Gibraltar. he mentions his Intention to pursue his Voyage the first Opportunity and he particularly desired that I would inform you he was well & would write to you from Malta to which place he desired that any Letters might be addressed to him. I regret with you that he had not remained quietly at Home till Affairs abroad were more settled and better adapted to the Tourist and his own Affairs had been first under Arrangement. I am sure that no Person could take more Pains than I did to prevail on his Lordship to remain at Home[.]

I certainly agree with you that if the Farms at Newstead will bear an Advance of Rent that they ought to be raised. I had some Conversation with Lord Byron upon this Subject just before he left England but he then expressed his Dislike to grant Leases without which it will I fear be difficult to get the full Amount of Rent unless some Money is laid out in Repairs, for Tenants will not sink Money unless they have Leases. however that another year may not pass over I have directed Mealey to serve the Tenants with Notices to quit at Lady Day next in order that the advanced Rents may take place from that Period in case it should be thought that they are capable of Advance. I think it will be proper to have all the Farms looked over by a competent Person who should go over all the Farms and not do it by apportioning any estimated Advance amongst the Tenants. Mr Chambers is a very skilfull and intelligent Man and I have a very high Opinion of him but we have his former Valuation and can form a pretty near Guess of the proper advance proportionate with the increased Prices of Grain since his Valuation. for this Reason only I confess I should prefer having the Opinion of another Surveryor. I could send a very proper Person down who does a great deal of Business in that Line. I sent him to value Lord Byron's Estate in Norfolk and he valued it at £4500, which was talked of as an enormous Valuation and yet we have sold it for within a few Pounds of that Sum. If you agree with me in this Measure I will send him down and get him to do it at as little Expense as possible.[.]

I would not have you be uneasy on the Subject of Miss Parkyns or Mr Wyldes Debt for Lord Byron has in case any Thing should happen to him which God forbid, made ample Revision for Payment of all his Debts. nevertheless I cannot help observing that I think if the remaining part of your Fortune could be raised and a Security given to you upon ye Newstead Estate to secure you the Income of it, that it would be the best way of paying off Miss Parkyns and Mr Wylde and what remains would be desirable to go in Discharge of Lord Byron's Debts[.] I mention this as an Arrangement that would be more beneficial to Lord Byron than to yourself for I cannot conceal from you that the Plan which his Lordship recommended to you of sinking the Rochdale in an Annuity for your Life would be infinitely more beneficial to you, but if you waive that offer it certainly would be offering a considerable accommodation to his Lordship in the Arrangement of his Debts. but I should not do Justice to you if I were to urge your Acquiescence in that Measure. it must therefore rest with you own Inclinations. Whatever Course you may determine upon, there will be no Difficulty in giving proper Releases for the Money as Lord Byron has left ample Powers with use for the purpose[.]

The Interest of Miss Parkyns and Wylde's Debts should be paid out of the Rents of Newstead and as Lord Byron has delegated Powers to me to receive the Rents it will be for me to receive them and when received I will make those Payments in the very first Instance.

Your Wish to reduce Ld Byron's Expenses at Newstead is highly laudable and I wish some Plan cod be hit upon to Reform the Expense of ye live Animals there which really is [paper torn] most unnecessary Expence[.] With respect to the [paper torn] Hut Public House there is no Manner of [paper torn] why Mealey should have [paper torn] particular [paper torn] Indulgence and if any new B[paper torn] are erected which certainly are wanting, he must pay a proper Additional Rent and I think it would answer to his Lordship to lay out a little Money upon that Property if it could be contrived[.] Indeed if we do not do so I fear some other Neighboring Proprietor will be building a House with more Accommodation which would annihilate the Hut Tavern.

I am truly concerned to hear that your Health has been so indifferent, but I hope it is better[.] Mine has not been the best for sometime past[.] Mrs Hanson and all my Family are well and write with me in kindest Regards and with every good Wish believe me Dear Madam

Your faithful & sincere servt
John Hanson
Farleigh House
26th Sepr 1809


1810
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Letter 84.   Margaret Pigot to Catherine Byron, [March? 1810]

In this undated letter Margaret Pigot of Southwell thanks Catherine Byron for sending her the new edition of Lord Byron’s English Bards and Scotch Reviewers and a copy of John Cam Hobhouse’s Imitations and Translations from the Ancient and Modern Classics (1809) which included several poems by Byron. She finds Hobhouse’s poetry contemptible.

To Mrs Byron
Newstead Abbey

Indeed my dear Mrs Byron you have given me a very great treat in sending me English Bards to look at, you know how very highly I thought of the first edition and this is certainly much improved, indeed I do not think any body but Lord Byron cou’d (in these our days) have produced such a work, for it has all the fire of ancient genius. I have always been accustomed to tell you my thoughts most sincerely, and I cannot say that I like that addition to the part where Bowles is mentioned, it wants that brilliant spirit which almost invariably accompanies Ld B— writings. Maurice too, and his “granite weight of leaves, is in truth a heavy comparison, but I turn with pleasure from these specks in the Sun, to notice “Vice and folly Greville and Argyle. it is most admirable. the same pen may equal, but I think it is not in the power of human abilities to exceed it. as to Lord Carlisle I think he well deserves the Note Ld B— has put in. I am very much pleased with it, and the little word Amen at the end, gives a point indescribably good. the whole of the conclusion is excellent, and the Postscript I think must entertain every body except Jeffrey and Clark. I hope the poor Bear is well, I wish you could make him understand that he is immortalized, for if four leg’d Bears have any vanity it wou[’]d certainly delight him. Walter Scott too (I really do not mean to call him a Bear) will be highly gratified[;] the compliment to him is very elegant. in short I look upon it as a most highly finished work and Lord Byron has certainly taken the Palm from all our Poets. I will now say a few words of his friend Mr Hobhouse tho he is a creature made of such different material that I cannot make up my mind to suppose there can be any real friendship as from his writings I look upon him as the most contemptible of all mean things[.] I cannot imagine what put it into his head to publish, indeed if he had left out every word of his own absurd vicious nonsense the Book would have been worth having. Lord Byrons are all most beautiful and Hobhouse only disgusts more, by being in such captivating and elegant company. are not you charm’d with that beginning “And wilt thou weep when I am low, it is Elizabeths favorite. I am very fond of “Well thou art happy. I never met with any drinking song which had so much mind in it as Lord B—. pray do you know who J. L. is, we admire him exceedingly. so we do J. H. B. who is he. as to Hobhouse where he intends to be pathetic I cannot help laughing[.] what stuff that is on the Death of a young Lady and the verse written by him to a Lady in Strangfords Camoens are bad beyond any thing which ever pretended to feeling or elegance. I have not yet seen your Servant Ann, as I was from home when she call[’]d but am happy to hear that Lord B— is received as he ought to be in ?Jirdey?[.] I shall have many questions to ask her, and hope to hear a good account of yourself which I assure you will always give the most sincere pleasure to

my dear Mrs Byrons
very Affectionate friend
Margt Pigot

Elizabeth begs her compts



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Letter 85.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 12 March 1810

Mrs. Byron asks whether John Hanson has had news of her son from Constantinople.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London

Mrs Byron wishes Mr Hanson would inform her whither he has heard from Lord Byron either by the Entreprenante, or by the Gleaner Schooner both from Constantinople. the Last arrived the sixth of this month[.]

Newstead Abbey
12th March 1810


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Letter 86.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 20 March 1810

Byron’s servant Robert Rushton, the son of a Newstead tenant farmer, has returned to Nottinghamshire from Spain with the promise that Byron would pay for his education. John Hanson did not regard himself as bound by that pledge, and attempted to find a living for Rushton at Newstead where, Mrs. Byron reports, his proposal was being resisted by the Newstead steward, Owen Mealey.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Pr favor of Mr Neil
Newstead Abbey 20th March 1810
Dear Sir

I cannot conceive why Byron remains so long at Patras. he must have been there two months when he wrote to you, and by what you say does not intend to leave it till he receives your answer, and what is very odd there has been a letter received from Mr Hobhouse about the time you got yours dated Decr 5th 1809 from Malta. all this I dont understand.

Roushton has a Son whom he wishes much to be allowed to live in the Castle for a time. it is certainly falling down for want of a Tenant and I think it would do good, but Mealey says they will do much mischief[.] but I dare say he knows nothing about it, but says so because he dont like the Roushtons[.] I remain

Sir
& & &
C G Byron

P.S. Roushtons Son has left a farm & cant get another—



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Letter 87.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 22 June 1810

John Hanson discusses the debts Lord Byron left behind when going abroad. Milnes, his tailor (who had once bailed out Byron's father), is threatening an execution over a £900 bill. Byron also left unpaid a large bill from the Nottingham upholsterer Benjamin Brothers for lavishly refurnishing Newstead Abbey in 1809. But most pressing on Mrs. Byron were the Nottingham loans for which she was responsible. She had agreed to pay these out of her personal estate in Scotland, but her Edinburgh solicitor, Hugh Watson, had informed her that John Hanson's power of attorney, required to complete the transaction, was not sufficient under Scottish law. The following letters describe this dilemma further.

Honble Mrs Byron
Newstead Abbey
Nottingham
 
Dear Madam

I have just received Mr Watson's Letter which you forwarded to me and I write to him upon the Subject by this Nights Post and if after what I have sayd to him he still thinks that the Power of Atty. which I possess is not sufficient[.] I hope he will immediately send me a proper one to forward to his Lordship as I am sure that without this Money his Lordship will be placed in a Situation of great Difficulty and Embarrassment[.] Lord Byron was so unguarded as to give Mr Milnes his Taylor a Judgment for abt 900£ before he left England and this Man is threatening to sue out an Execution[.] with respect to Brothers he can do nothing till Xmas[.] I received a Letter yesterday from Ld Byron dated the 17th of April on Board the Salsette Frigate at Anchor off the Plains of Troy[.] he was perfectly well & still presses for post Remittances which cannot be supplied him. This will be a most Expensive Tour to him[.] I am Dr Madam

Yours faithfully
John Hanson
Chancery Lane
22d June 1810


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Letter 88.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 8 July 1810

John Hanson is finding it increasingly difficulty to meet Lord Byron's obligations, and apparently Mrs Byron had offered £3,000 from her personal estate to assist with paying her son’s debts. This appears to be the money which she had lent to Sir James Grant in December, 1804. Hanson proposes a mortgage on Newstead Abbey in exchange for it, but the complicated transaction was being held up because the power of attorney Byron had granted to Hanson was not accepted in Scotland. Hammersley’s Bank, at 76 Pall Mall, did business in Constantinople.

Honble Mrs Byron
Newstead Abbey
Nottingham
Dear Madam

I have written to Mr Watson of Edinburgh to inform him the Nature of ye Powers which I have from Lord Byron which are general to receive Money from any one and to give all legal & Effectual Discharges[.] And if it is not confirmable to the forms of ye Scotch Law I have desired him to transmit me the necessary form to send over to his Lordship[.] and if it cannot be had over by the Time fixed for Payment of ye Money his Lordship must pay you Interest as you must not be a Looser[.]

I think when you know of the various & daily Calls that are made by Lord Byrons Credrs for Bills to ye amount of upwards of £10,000, and Annuities daily accruing to the Amount of between two and £3,000 a year without any Funds to answer a tenth Part ?from? of them and his Lordships answered Calls for Remittances you will allow that I am placed in a Situation of infinite Perplexity and if your £3000 is not to be forthcoming I dont see what can be done to appease the People. I recommend your £3000 to be a Loan on Mortgage at £5 Per Cent on part of Newstead Estate[.] I have written to his Lordship very fully on the Subject of his Affairs and I have suggested to his Consideration the only Plan which can in my Judgment relieve him from all his Difficulties.

I now enclose you £20. which I will trouble you to pay the ?Sheeper? on Account of his Wages & will be obliged to you to send me his Receipt as a voucher. Mr Wylde I have written to to desire his Agent to call on me for his Interest which will save you the Trouble of sending to him and Mrs Geo Byron and Miss Parkyns[.] I will endeavour to pay when the Interest becomes due. I forwarded your Letter to Lord Byron who I am surprized has never [paper torn] I wrote him long ago[.]

I lodged £1000 in Messrs Hammersleys Hands last December for four Letters of Credit making 3000£ since he left England & the other Day I lodged 300£ more which was all that could be spared and in a very few Days there will be near £1000 to pay which I have not Funds to answer[.] I hope you continue well & am Dr Madam

Dear Madam
Yrs very faithfully
John Hanson


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Letter 89.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, [Late summer 1810]

John Hanson has received the document granting him powers of attorney from Mrs. Byron’s Edinburgh solicitor and has forwarded it to Constantinople for Lord Byron to sign.

Honble Mrs Byron
Newstead Abbey
Nottingham
Dear Madam

My last Letter would set your Mind at Ease about Mr Brothers's Threats as he can do nothing for many Months and I hope by that Time we shall be able to satisfy him. I suspect his Charges for ye Goods are very extravagant as I cannot get a Bill from him[.]

Mr Watson has sent me the proper Power of Atty. for Lord Byron to execute which I have forwarded to his Lordship at Constantinople to which Place he mentd in his last Letter, dated the 17th of April, he was going to return. Mr Watson mentions in his Letter that in case the Power should not be sent back in Time he will make the best Bargain he can with Sir James Grant and the Person who advances the Money and he hopes it may be arranged without Loss of Interest, but if there shod be any, it certainly must not fall on you[.] I am sorely perplexed with the Creditors having no Means of satisfying them[.] I was sorry to hear so indifferent an Account of your Health but I hope now that summer Weather is come you will find an Alteration for ye better. With Every good Wish believe me Dr Madam

your most faithful obed servt
John Hanson


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Letter 90.   The Duke of Devonshire to Catherine Byron, 18 October 1810

The Duke of Devonshire, apologizing for the tardiness of his reply, agrees to help stock to ponds at Newstead Abbey with fish from Hardwick Hall.

Hardwick Octber 18th 1810
Madam

I write this to make excuses to you for not having answered sooner the letter you wrote to me some time ago, the reason of which has been, that the shutters to the ponds at Hardwick being out of order the water could not be let off, to shew what fish were there.

Since I have been here I have ascertained that there have been no fish bred here, except about forty brace of tench in one pond, and if you chuse to have half of them for the water at Newstead Abby they are at your service, and in that case you will be so good as to inform John Hall, (the keeper here) of it. I have the honor to be Madam

your most obed &
Humble Servant
Devonshire


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Letter 91.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 31 December 1810

Months have passed and John Hanson has not received the power of attorney he requires to apply Mrs Byron’s Scottish funds to pay Lord Byron’s Nottinghamshire debts. While other creditors are being accommodating, the upholsterer Brothers, facing bankruptcy, will proceed with an execution against Lord Byron’s effects at Newstead Abbey.

Honble Mrs Byron
Newstead Abbey
Nottingham
 
Dear Madam

I have written to Lord Byron three letters since he left England, and the last I wrote to him was on the 9th of June last, and which I entrusted to the Care of Major Carey a friend of mine, who was going to Malta, and who promised me he would forward it from thence the moment he arrived, but as your last dispatches from his Lordship were dated in August, he could then have received it. I transmitted in that letter the necessary power to enable us to give a discharge to Sir James Grant for the Mortgage money. If the power does not soon arrive it will be attended with very unpleasant consequences, for the time for payment of the remaining part of Brothers's Debt amounting to £1572:2:0 stands for the 31st of January and no farther time can be obtained, so that he will immediately sue out an Execution against Lord Byron's Effects at Newstead, if not then paid, as I have no prospect of receiving funds from any other quarter to pay it, I have written to all Mr Watson to propose the payment of Sir James Grant's Money upon your and my discharge and Indemnity, until the power of Attorney is returned when the release can be given according to the Scotch Form, and I hope he will get the Parties to consent to it. there can be no risk in it, as I am persuaded his Lordship will dispatch the Power immediately after it reaches him. A letter from you to Mr Watson making the same request would I am persuaded have a good effect, and I make no doubt, you will readily do it by the first post[.] The other Creditors have behaved very well, and there is nothing particularly pressing, but this Business of Brothers: Altho the forestalling some of the Rents due last Michaelmas perplexed me very much as they were to be appropriated by Lord Byron's Order to some particular payments, and a part of them must be so applied next half year. Mr Rushton has made a set off for his Son's Schooling to a large amount to which I know nothing of and cannot allow. What a Pity it is that his Lordship is not now at Home signalizing himself in the House at a Time the most important to his Country. I hope you continue well and wishing you many happy return of the Season. Believe me

Dear Madam
Your most faithful obedt Serv
John Hanson
31 December 1810


1811
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Letter 92.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 8 January 1811

John Hanson is making arrangements to cover Mrs Byron’s potential loss of income from her £3000 personal estate by mortgaging farms on the Newstead property. But without access to that money his efforts to forestall the Brothers’ suit will be for nought. Nor has Hanson been able to pay off the other Nottingham creditors from the Newstead rents since Lord Byron had tied his hands with prior obligations.

Honble Mrs Byron
Newstead Abbey
Nottingham
 
Dear Madam

I am glad you have written to Mr Watson, for without a part of that money I have no possible means of meeting Mr Brothers's demand which he will insist upon, on the 31st of this month, as I have no funds in hand; I certainly meant that you should have an immediate Mortgage upon a sufficient Part of Newstead Estate, and I will prepare it and as the Interest will amount to £150 a year I should imagine if you sold it upon the Farms of Richard Hardstaff of Wire Mill Francis Truemans and Joseph Coleman it would be sufficient whose rents will be as follows.

Richard Hardstaffs 100
Francis Truemans 34
Joseph Colemans 55
189

And that you have no trouble or disappointment in receiving your Interest half yearly, I would direct them to pay you half yearly out of their rents. If you approve of this, I will immediately preface the necessary Mortgage Deed, that it may be ready when the Money arrives from Scotland which I hope it will do by the 31st. I cannot admit that I have deceived you in any Promise I made, to pay the Interest of Mrs George Byrons and Mr Wyldes Debts. it was out of the rents only that these payments could be made, and had I been allowed to receive them they would have been so appropriated, but the last rents were anticipated by Payments made by the Tenants which were never ordered and sanctioned by me: no blame therefore attaches upon me. I have only received £195 of the last rent, and that with £15 more was appropriated to purposes expressly ordered by Lord Byron. However, all these claims of Interest of Mrs G. Byron and Mr Wild's, and a considerable part of the Principal may be liquidated out of your £3000. If this money does not come by the 31st this month it will not be in my power to prevent unpleasant measures being there taken by Mr Brothers[.]

I am Dear Madam
your most faithful and
obed Servt.
John Hanson
Chancery Lane
8th January 1811


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Letter 93.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 15 January 1811

The drama continues: John Hanson has received a letter from Lord Byron dated October, but without the power of attorney. He reassures Mrs Byron (who had been purchasing jewelry as her own form of personal security) that any execution at Newstead Abbey would only involve her son’s property.

Honble Mrs Byron
Newstead Abbey
Nottingham
 
Dear Madam

It is now upwards of a Fortnight since I wrote to Mr Watson and have not received any Answer from him which I wonder very much at but I trust we shall yet hear satisfactorily from him in Time[.]

You need not be under any Apprehension for ye Safety of any Property belonging to you at Newstead as nothing but what actually belongs to Ld Byron can be seized under an Execution. you have not been rightly informed on that Subject. You seem to think it was my Fault that Ld Byron did not give Security for Mrs Byrons & Miss Parkyns's Money before he left England but it was not. I mentioned it to his Lordship more than once but he sayd he did not think it necessary meaning, no doubt as his Lordship did, to discharge the Debts the first Opportunity[.]

I yesterday received a Letter from his Lordship from Patras in the Morea dated the 2d of Octr. he had not then received ye Instrument which I sent out from Mr Watson but he must have received it soon after that Date and I make no doubt it is now on its way way back but I fear there is no Chance of its arriving before this Month is over[.] His Lordship mentions his Intention of returning soon to Athens and was very well. Do you think you can make any Interest with Brothers to wait till the Instrument arrives[?] if you can the sooner it is done the better to prevent his proceeding to an Execution which he will be at Liberty to do on the 1st of Feby if the Money is not then paid. I am Dear Madam

your obed servt
John Hanson
Chancery Lane
15th Jany 1811


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Letter 94.   Catherine Byron to John Hanson, 17 January 1811

Efforts to obtain relief from Scotland have failed. Despairing over the coming execution at Newstead, Mrs. Byron appeals to John Hanson to take out a loan to pay the Brothers’ bill for £1500 with herself as security, or to pay the bill out of his personal funds, offering herself as his security.

John Hanson Esqr
No 6 Chancery Lane
London
Newstead Abbey 17th Jany 1811
Dear Sir

I send you Mr Watsons letter to me[.] all that business is now at an end, and the money cannot be procured for the present. it is certainly very hard if Lord Byrons effects here are sold off for the sum of fifteen hundred pounds due to Brothers, and you I suppose know when things are sold under such circumstances they go for about nothing. I believe what is in the House is fairly worth about four thousand pounds[—]books, wines & & &. It would be particularly provoking when perhaps the power of Attorney might arrive a few days or weeks after, and you know that I will then have it in my power to pay the money. to avert so great an evil taking place I will join with you in any security if you will procure this money, or give you any security in my power if you will advance the money yourself.

But you surely can procure fifteen hundred pounds on this Estate or it is very odd indeed and if you can give me security you can do the same to others. I again repeat what steps am I to take to secure my own property in case the worst should happen? if the money from Scotland had arrived, or when it can be procured I have no objection to make to the security on the Farms you mention. I had a letter from Byron a few days ago dated the 2d October 1810 from Patras in the Morea, but Athens is his head quarters, and he desires his letter to be sent to Malta. he is very angry that he has never received one line from you since he left England[.] indeed he will not believe that you have written. it is odd that yours have missed, mine have reached him. there ought to have been an answer to the one including the power of Attorney by this time.



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Letter 95.   John Hanson to Catherine Byron, 28 May 1811

On the 23rd of May Mrs Byron had written to John Hanson reporting that the bailiffs had at last arrived at Newstead Abbey. Hanson acted quickly, for in this letter of the 28th he informs her that an accommodation had been reached with Brothers and that the bailiffs would soon be removed. Sometime during the week Byron's valet, John Fletcher, belatedly arrived at Newstead bearing the power of attorney signed by Byron which Hanson had requested in July or August of 1810. While she had concealed the fact from her son, Mrs Byron's health was failing, and she would die on the first of August while Byron, who had returned in mid-July, was still in London negotiating with his creditors.

Honble Mrs Byron
Newstead Abbey
Nottingham
 
Dear Madam

I have this Moment seen Mr Hodgkinson and have settled with him that the Execution which Brothers has sent in shall be withdrawn as soon as I have given him the proper Security which will shall be done Tomorrow if Brothers declines to accept my Proposal to accept Bills for the Amount of the Debt. In a Post or two the Men will be directed to withdraw from the House. I heartily wish Lord Byron would come Home that his Affairs may be put under some Arrangement. You will tell Rushton that he must not venture to remove any Thing until he receives Mr Hodgkinsons or Mr Barrow's express Directions for it[.] I am Dr Madam

Yrs most faithfully
John Hanson
Chy Lane
28th May 1811


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Letter 96.   Margaret Keith Abercromby to Catherine Byron, 26 July [1811]

In what was likely the last letter Mrs Byron received before her death, her old friend Miss Abercromby wishes her well of Byron’s return, relates the news from Harrogate, Yorkshire, and offers some literary gossip about Edinburgh writers.

To the Honble Mrs Byron Gordon
Newstead Abbey, Nottingham
Crown Inn, Harrogate
Friday 26th July
My dear Madam

I congratulate you upon Lord Byron’s safe return to England—so the newspaper tells me I hope his Lordship is perfectly well, & has been recompensed for all his labours, & difficulties by the various parts of the World he has explored, & the addition of knowledge he has acquired—& I should suppose, He must feel very happy to be again at Newstead Abby—He returns at an eventful period—our good King may linger a while, but surely never can assume the reins of Government—You will be surprized that I am here—I was advized to drink the waters here for some weeks, to remove a bilious tendency, to which I have been long subject, & which last year assumed an alarming appearance—It has this year been much more gentle—but as my Brother, at any rate proposed a stop at Harrogate, I took a sudden resolution of accompanying him—He proposes moving Southward, after my stay here is over—I intent to shape my course back to Scotland, & hope to find some suitable person to travel with—

We only arrived on Wednesday—were recommended to stop at this Inn on account of the vicinity to the Well, that it is peculiarly well kept, & now resorted to by very genteel company—which had not used to be the case some years ago—

We find very good Society—nothing particularly agreeably—nor do I like the company or place, half as well as Malvern Wells—several of our country folks are here—Mr & Mrs Hepburn of Clerkington—a handsome elegant couple—she was a Gordon of Rockville—Lady Pringle senr &c. &c. Upper Harrogate has neither been full nor dashing this Season—

The water agrees with me—& I shall probably continue it three weeks—I beg the pleasure of hearing from you very soon—wth full particulars of Lord Byron, & of your health. I trust it is fully reestablished, to which Lord Byron’s return I am sure would aid—

We left our friend Mrs Clark—who suffers much pain from some inward disorder, which cannot be cured—She is extremely cheerful & patient, but her situation is indeed dispiriting—She had been able to move to Chesterhall wth her Son & his Family—I thought herself somewhat relieved by the purer & cooler air—

Walter Scott has published another Poem 'The Vision of Don Roderique'—It certainly will not add to his fame as a Poet—He generously gave the price of the copy right to the Subscription for the Portugues.—

You enquire if I read the Winter at Edb——did not as I hate all such productions—I never heard who wrote it; Honoria Scott is a fictitious name—

I forget if I mentioned to you a Novel written & published last winter at Edinr Self Control?—It has merit & was universally read—has been through two Editions—The Authoress still unknown—

I have been much amused by Anna Sewards letters—I am now reading Hannah More’s Practical Piety which is admirably well written & I trust will do good—

My Brother offers you his best wishes, & joins with me in respects to Lord Byron.

I intended to put this letter under cover to his Ldp—but an idea has occurred that he may not be at Newstead Abbey—I shall therefore allow you to pay for it because no M.P. is here—

Adieu my dear Madam wth much regard I am
very truly yours
Margaret K. Abercromby.

PS I observe I have forgot to acknowledge yours of 1st June—which was much too short—



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Letter 97.   John Hanson[?] to The Morning Herald, August 1811

A death notice, presumably by John Hanson but written in a scribal hand, addressed to the Morning Herald. The notice was reprinted in a number of periodicals. Catherine Byron had died the first of August.

The Morning Herald

On Thursday last died at Newstead Abbey after a short Illness the Hon’ble Mrs Gordon Byron the Mother of the Right Hon’ble Lord Byron and a Lineal Descendant of Margaret of Huntley and the Princess             Stuart Daughter of James the first of Scotland—